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simple c++ language question

may be this will sound realy dumb but...
when you have this code:

void f()
{
  TCHAR szName[200];
  ZeroMemory( szName, 200 );
}
void g()
{
 static TCHAR szSurname[200];
 ZeroMemory( szSurname, 200 );

}

void main()
{
 for( int i = 0; i < 10 ; i++ )
 {
    f();
    g();
 }
}

how many time will szName be allocated?

thanks.
A.
0
Agarici
Asked:
Agarici
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3 Solutions
 
AgariciAuthor Commented:
i know that szSurname will be allocated only once
but what about szName?
0
 
jkrCommented:
Since 'szName()' is non-static, it'll be allocated on the stack ten times, that's what the loop

for( int i = 0; i < 10 ; i++ )

does for i ranging from 0...9.
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LinkyCommented:
szName will be allocated 10 times, ZeroMemory will clear the block each time though.
0
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AgariciAuthor Commented:
well... that is what i also know...
i asked this because i had a dispute with a collegue of mine... and he was saying that szName will only be alocated once on the stack... with such a strong belief that made me wory...

thanks
A.
0
 
jkrCommented:
>>he was saying that szName will only be alocated once on the stack

For 'f()', that's true, but since 'f()' is called 10 times in the loop...

The key difference here is the 'static' keyword on the other local variable, which specifies that the variable has static duration (it is allocated when the program begins and deallocated when the program ends).
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AgariciAuthor Commented:
what if i have:
void f()
{
 for( int i = 0 ; i < 10 ; i++)
 {  
     TCHAR szName[200];
     ZeroMemory( szName, 200 );
 }
}

void main()
{
 for( int i = 0; i < 10 ; i++ )
 {
    f();
 }
}

there will be 100 allocations, corect?
0
 
jkrCommented:
Yes and no. Most modern compilers will move the declaration out of the loop body when set to perform any optimizations in release builds, but when compiling without any optimizations enabled, you're right, it will be allocated 100 times.
0
 
itsmeandnobodyelseCommented:
>>>> For 'f()', that's true, but since 'f()' is called 10 times in the loop...

A good compiler won't make any allocation cause the call to f() might get a subject of optimization cause it doesn't change anything in the calling main().

In Debug mode all optimizations were switched off and you easily can verify that the storage was created 10 times (on the stack so it may get the same address any time). If you replace " TCHAR szName[200];"  by a class object, e. g. "CString strName;" or "std::string strName" you can step into the constructor and destructor any time f() was called.

Regards, Alex

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AgariciAuthor Commented:
ok
thank you all for the replys
A.
0
 
rstaveleyCommented:
> he was saying that szName will only be alocated once on the stack...

It gets allocated on the stack each time the function is called when it is automatic, but what your colleague may have been thinking is that the memory is released when the function exists, so the same chunk of memory will be typically be allocated each time, when you call the function in your loop.
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rstaveleyCommented:
s/when the function exists/when the function exits/
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