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Recover root Crontab

Posted on 2006-07-17
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
Just now I accidently do crontab -r which i think is for remove the crontab list

I need to recover the default Solaris10 x86 root crontab...anyone has it?
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Question by:operation1611
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Tintin earned 50 total points
ID: 17126227
This is the default sparc Solaris 10 root crontab

#ident  "@(#)root       1.21    04/03/23 SMI"
#
# The root crontab should be used to perform accounting data collection.
#
#
10 3 * * * /usr/sbin/logadm
15 3 * * 0 /usr/lib/fs/nfs/nfsfind
30 3 * * * [ -x /usr/lib/gss/gsscred_clean ] && /usr/lib/gss/gsscred_clean
#10 3 * * * /usr/lib/krb5/kprop_script ___slave_kdcs___


Not sure if the x86 version varies from this.
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by:operation1611
ID: 17127605
great...thanks
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