Index and column ordinal position

Hi experts,

I recently added a new column to an existing table using
Alter table star12 add ID_GRP_RISK char(12)

The new field appears in last position when I run a desc on the table.

Now I need to create a new PK / Unique index using both the first column and the newly created one. Should column position be a concern.

I remember from my (old ;-) ) oracle days that column position might affect performances. I don't have the slightest idea if the version I use now (9i) has changed anything reagrding this column ordering.

Would a REORG be sufficient to get decent performances (after changing the unique index / primary key)

NB : dropping/creating the table to change its stucture was not an option.

Any comments welcome (I know I could find this kind of information on the net or simply browsing the KB .. I'm not lazy but my current mission does not leave me much time)

Hilaire
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HilaireAsked:
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Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]Connect With a Mentor Billing EngineerCommented:
>Now I need to create a new PK / Unique index using both the first column and the newly created one. Should column position be a concern.
no. PK and indexes can be created on any column, whatever position they have in the table.
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actonwangCommented:
>>. Should column position be a concern.

      only the order you put into "create index ... on table1(col1,col2)" matters.
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johnsoneConnect With a Mentor Senior Oracle DBACommented:
That was always done for a few.

The first is looks.  The table looks better in the describe if the key fields are first.

They used to claim that there was a neglible performance increase in indexing if the key fields were first.  I never heard of anyone proving it though.

The biggest was storage.  Since disk is cheap now and storage is structured so much differently, that is not a concern anymore.

The storage savings is due to the fact that Oracle does not store trailing null columns.  This is why they had always suggested that all not null columns come first in the table.  Take these 2 tables for example:

test1 has columns a, b, and c.   a and c are not null and b is nullable.

test2 has columns a, c,  and b.  a and c are not null and b is nullable.

If b is null in test1, Oracle has to store a 1 byte length in the record.  If b is null in test2, nothing is stored in its place.

Over the course of millions of records and multiple columns, the space usage can add up.
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