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When is it ok to delete old/disabled user accounts?

I have a client running SBS 2003 with a high employee churn rate.  
In my user list there are more users no longer with the company than are currently employed.  At this time all of those accounts are disabled.
1. How does this affect the number of CALS I have available for new employees?
2. What are the recommendations / best practices in regards to deleting these accounts?
     I would like to be able to delete them and clean things up...
Thanks for the help,

// John
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johnbadams
Asked:
johnbadams
2 Solutions
 
NzarthCommented:
By the sounds of it you would already have exceeded you CALs limit if disabled accounts were taken into account.  So to answer your 1st question it has no effect.

To answer your second question it depends and varies from site to site.

Things to take into account is a) will those accounts ever be used again? b) Are their emails addresses still being used?

If the answer is no then you should be able to delete them with no problems....  
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
1. If an account is disabled then it doesn't use up a CAL, but you can always check how many CAL's you've used by looking at Licensing in the Server Management Console.

2.  As for maintenance of a company with high turnover, I have a similar situation where I think we came up with a reasonable solution.  Generally, I'm in favor of disabling a former employee's account, migrating their files and emails to their supervisor and completely purging their account identity after 30 days (with the exception of SharePoint which we keep in tact because of the way it tags contributions to the site).

But when you have fairly high turnover in certain positions, I think it's best to use the same AD user account which is modified for the new employee.  For example, you would create a user account called "CustServ" using the default user template with the add-user wizard.  Then, let's say Cindy is the first person in that position.  You would do the following to the CustServ Account:

-- change the user logon name to Cindy (in both boxes on the Account tab).
-- ADD an additional SMTP email address for cindy@mycompany.com, keeping CustServ@mycompany.com as the Default.  
-- change the Email Alias to Cindy
-- change the password

Then, when Cindy leaves, you immediately disable the account if there isn't a replacement right away, or if there is, you change each of the four items listed above with the new user's name.  The only place I've found that this can cause an issue is with a user's local profile.  If this person will generally use the same computer, you can log onto that computer with the original CustServ account right after you make it and then that will create the user profile that will stick with each of these users (even though you will change their login name, the profile is tied to the SID, so it will still be CustServ).

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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johnbadamsAuthor Commented:
thank you both
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