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Conversions in ref classes // c++ 2005

Posted on 2006-07-20
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Last Modified: 2010-04-24
What shall be done to compile following code and to apply following conversion:

ref class ttt
{
private:
      System::String^ MyString;
public:
      ttt(){}
      ttt(System::String^ InVal)
      {
            MyString = InVal;
      }
      void operator = (System::String^ InVal)
      {
            MyString = InVal;
      }      
};

int main(array<System::String ^> ^args)
{      
      System::String^ sysStr;
      sysStr = "system strring";
      
      ttt^ TEST = gcnew ttt();
      TEST = sysStr;                             // Not compiling - conversion needed
      
    return 0;
}
0
Comment
Question by:PLABB
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7 Comments
 
LVL 48

Expert Comment

by:AlexFM
ID: 17145746
Replace
TEST = sysStr;
with:
*TEST = sysStr;
0
 
LVL 48

Expert Comment

by:AlexFM
ID: 17145768
TEST = sysStr;
This is attempt to assign String^ to ttt reference.

*TEST = sysStr;
In this case String^ is assigned to ttt instance, this is compiled because class ttt has operator= (String^).
0
 

Author Comment

by:PLABB
ID: 17145852
but String^ is a also a reference. It should be possible to assign reference to reference shouldn't it
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LVL 48

Expert Comment

by:AlexFM
ID: 17145913
Assign reference to reference is another task. For example:

String^ s1 = gcnew String(L"1");
String^ s2 = gcnew String(L"2");

s2 = s1;

Now s2 points to s1, and previous instance of s2 is out of scope. In your case:

TEST = sysStr;

You try to assign string reference to ttt reference. These two types are not compatible, and this is not compiled: reference to string cannot point to ttt. However, when you write:

*TEST = sysStr;

reference to string is assigned to class instance. Since class has operator=(String^), this is compiled. Class knows what to do with String^ when it is assigned to class instance:
MyString = InVal;

Class assigns this string instance to it's own String^ variable. Notice that String^ is assigned to String^ - legal operation, and to to ttt^.
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LVL 48

Accepted Solution

by:
AlexFM earned 500 total points
ID: 17145928
If you know C++, consider that ttt is unmanaged class which has operator=(char*), and TEST is ttt*. In this case:
TEST = "abc";
is not compiled, and
*TEST = "abc";
is compiled - exactly the same case.
0
 

Author Comment

by:PLABB
ID: 17146056
One more question:
What is then System::String^ when we can assign:
System::string^ abc;
abc = "abc";
0
 
LVL 48

Expert Comment

by:AlexFM
ID: 17146370
Good question. I will return to this later, now I need to go.
0

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