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Network configuration

Posted on 2006-07-20
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Last Modified: 2010-03-19
This is a huge question: If I could give 1000 points I would for this one.

I have four locations:

LOC1 - Main
LOC2 - Across Street
LOC3 - Another City
LOC4 - Another State

All the locations have at least 30 users, LOC1 has 250 users.

All locations need to speak to LOC1.

Each location has major wireless going on.  We are running PPTP and the wireless is running over that (which I think sucks).

What I need is for someone to tell me how you would set it up??
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Question by:mputnam31
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by:Geisrud
ID: 17150085
I would lease a T1 line for LOC2-4 to connect to LOC1.  From there I would subnet 192.168.1.x for LOC1....192.168.4.x for LOC4 - and wireless from there.
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by:conradie
ID: 17150131
What do these offices need to share? IE what are the connections going to be used for? This will help answer the question properly.
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by:grsteed
ID: 17150135
I agree with Geisrud regarding T1's to the LOC1 site.  If business is critical I would also consider adding a DSL Backup from LOC2 to LOC3 and another from LOC3 to LOC4.  This would protect you in the event of any T1 going down.
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Author Comment

by:mputnam31
ID: 17150321
Offices need to share 10 different servers including Active Directory and Exchange.  Print Server, File server, application server.....

One location LOC4 has it's own exchange server 2003 (the main location LOC1 will be upgraded from Exchange 2000 to 2003 this weekend).  
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by:PanicX
PanicX earned 200 total points
ID: 17150344
With 250 users at Location 1, you may want to consider a class B subnet or some scheme that allows for more than 254 nodes per network.  This may be unnecessary depending on the hardware you implement, however I've found its best for hardware that's very picky about its gateway addresses, ie. Xerox printers, panasonic copiers.
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by:PanicX
PanicX earned 200 total points
ID: 17150367
Also, if you have line of site between locations 1 and 2, you may want to implement a wireless bridge for increased throughput, I would however keep an ISP as a backup for that connection.
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps458/ps460/index.html
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by:PanicX
ID: 17150405
Not to comment spam, but I also remembered this article you should find valuable
http://www.windowsnetworking.com/articles_tutorials/Active-Directory-Design-Considerations-Small-Networks.html

It really would be in your best interest to have a GC at each remote location.
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by:shniz123
shniz123 earned 200 total points
ID: 17150551
Be generous with the IP's do a class A or B but stay away from C (192) network as I've always saw a C network as a security risk. You'll outgrow it quicker than you think too. Shop around for some telcom services, internet .... they'll hold your hand all the way through bridging your networks together. You'll have to map it all out on paper but it's easier to implement than you think.

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by:SunBow
SunBow earned 100 total points
ID: 17150661
No comment except that there should be no major difference between different city and state, checkout MAN, and a big ditto on these:

PanicX > With 250 users at Location 1, you may want to consider a class B subnet or some scheme that allows for more than 254 nodes per network.
shniz123 > Be generous with the IP's

There are just too many reasons, and that probably includes were they a 24*7 shop with only 1/3rd of users online at a time. It is just too easy for a minor change to have a major impact later, so my vote is to handle that up front.
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by:mputnam31
ID: 17150797
Now let's add VLAN's into the mix.  Any suggestions on VLAN's???
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by:SunBow
ID: 17150994
Popular, ok. No suggestions from my corner as they are a bit too inadequate for some things from security and application POV.
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by:mputnam31
ID: 17151073
Hummm.  VLAN's seem the popular method for breaking up segments.  They are using them like crazy here.  A vlan for main office, a separate VLAN for each wireless, vlan for the kitchen,   is this good practice???
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shniz123 earned 200 total points
ID: 17151550
We use VLAN's and have 4 locations. It's not something you 'have' to do. But with the kind of trafic and potential growth you'll have it's easier to manage and troubleshoot ( I think anyway ).
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by:Geisrud
ID: 17154128
I definately agree with PanicX and Shniz123 on the subnetting (in hindsite).  A class C would be too small for LOC1.  So go class A.
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