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Linux | Red Hat | HP DL320 SATA Drive Mirroring

Posted on 2006-07-21
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I have a HP DL320 with built-in SATA RAID. In the bios I have the array built (two SATA drives setup as "Mirror"), set to active and marked "bootable". The server POST shows the array there but when I run the Red Hat ES setup it shows both drives at the partitionaing section. Is this right? I thought it would just show one drive since I'm running hardware mirroring? Do I just install to drive 0? Any input appreciated.

While we are on the subject is RAID 0 or 1 favored in a two drive server? This is going to be a DHCP/DNS/SMTP server.

Thanks again!!!
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Question by:MuddyMojo
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Author Comment

by:MuddyMojo
ID: 17153531
BTW - This is a NEW installation on a NEW server. No OS is currently installed.
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by:noci
noci earned 200 total points
ID: 17154025
I'm not sure about the setup in the DL320 BIOS,

But I can tell you more about RAID...

RAID 0 = Striping     You form 2s disk in such a way that They represent one BIG disk, IO is interleaved by the two disks and the capacity is DOUBLE,
                              1 disk failing is raid set down. And you DO need to revert to your backup.

RAID 1 = Mirroring   You form two disks to paired to one disk the size of one of those disks, one disk failing keeps the raidset running and give you time
                              to replace the failing disk with another one.

RAID 5 = Striping + Parity  N = 3+ disks are formed to an N-1 disk striping set with 1 parity disk. The failing disk can be recovered (compute intensive)
                              By combining the remaining disks + parity.   2 disk failing is Raid set down. The Storage capacity is N-1 disks.
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rindi earned 600 total points
ID: 17159153
NEVER use raid 0 on a server. If one disk breaks, you loose everything. Actually you should not use raid 0 at all, or only for temporary data, like when you need lots of fast accessible space, like when you are editing movies. As soon as those edits are finished, it is necessary to move the files to some safer areas.

You should use raid 1.

You probably need a driver floppy for the raid controller which you insert during the early stages of the linux setup process.

http://h18023.www1.hp.com/support/files/server/us/locate/1116_4762.html#8
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Author Comment

by:MuddyMojo
ID: 17175425
Found the HP driver for the pre-install...

http://h18023.www1.hp.com/support/files/server/us/locate/1116_6053.html

This is Red Hat ES 4 specific but HP has earlier drivers.
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