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Command "who" doesn't work

Posted on 2006-07-21
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
On my  CentOS 4.3 Box, command "who" doesn't work.
even if I type "w" I get only this:

 13:12:43 up 70 days,  3:37,  0 users,  load average: 1.86, 3.34, 4.79
USER     TTY      FROM              LOGIN@   IDLE   JCPU   PCPU WHAT


no user, no ip... how can I fix this?

Thanks
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Question by:DEIENO
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pjedmond earned 125 total points
ID: 17156100
I'm going to assume that this depends on the permissions.

who (and hence w) gets its information from /var/run/utmp or /var/run/wtmp

If you don't have permissions to access the file then you get what you've got. My /var/run/utp permissions are:

-rw-rw-r--    1 root     utmp         8832 Jul 21 19:05 /var/run/utmp

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