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Down grade kernel from (centos 4.3)2.6.9-34   to   (centos 4.2) 2.6.9-22.0.1.EL

Posted on 2006-07-21
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Last Modified: 2008-01-09
I am trying to set up oracle rac 10 on two linux boxes. Part of the setup is to install a firewire module oracle-firewire-modules-2.6.9-22.ELsmp-1286-1.i686.
However when I try to install it tell me that I need kernel version 2.6.9-22.
What are my options? Is it comon to downgrade, how would I go about it. Is it possible to modify some file that alters the kernel version it looks for. If I did this would the module work properly.  I am a begiiner to medium level when it comes to linux.
Thanks in advance.
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Question by:dplinnane
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Accepted Solution

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pjedmond earned 200 total points
ID: 17155762
Linux isn't really designed to 'downgrade'. It will be significantly easier  (and faster after all the tweaking that you may end up doing) to do a clean install with Centos 4.2

You could have a go at 'tweaking the:

'/etc/redhat-release'

file and see if that makes a difference in some 'dependency' circumstances, but in this case, the module is compiled specifically for a certain kernel. Abide by that, otherwise you will have problems!

(   (()
(`-' _\
 ''  ''
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LVL 88

Assisted Solution

by:rindi
rindi earned 150 total points
ID: 17156972
If you have up to now been using yum or up2date to keep your system current, and you also used that to update your kernel, then it is quite possible you still have that other kernel on your box. Check your /boot folder for kernels with that version, and also check the /boot/grub/menu.lst file for such entries. If the kernels are there but not in the menu.lst file, just add the appropriate entries. When booting you should then have that kernel as one of the options you can boot to.
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Author Comment

by:dplinnane
ID: 17157049
You could be right I know I have two options when I boot but I can't remember what they are.
It look like I will install centos 4.2 I haven't invested a whole lot of time into these linux machines. I'm just wondering do I have to have a cd to install from our can I download the version 4.2 files and run them from a folder rather then a cd, not sure if this is a silly question or not.
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LVL 16

Assisted Solution

by:xDamox
xDamox earned 150 total points
ID: 17157160
Hi,

To check you can do:

cat /boot/grub/menu.lst

In there you can see what kernel are available for you to use.

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Author Comment

by:dplinnane
ID: 17424484
I purchased centos 4.2 rather then mess with downgrading.
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