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propose head office router configuration

Posted on 2006-07-21
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Last Modified: 2010-04-08


Hello Calivnetter,

As a follow to the subject of type of Cisco router for the head office to branch connection

I was reviewing you response and you propose a 2811 series for head office.

>> As far as # of host now & allowing for growth at the main office, a 2811 or 2821
      will work for the main office;


Were you suggesting this router be use in conjunction with the existing Baystack router or should I replace the Baystack and use the new 2811  router?.

I am sorry I did not get to fully outline the head office setup, below is what I have in  mind  .

Outline below is my plan for head office

The Paradyne modem will be set up to allow all branch connection.
This modem will connect to propose Cisco router .
The propose Cisco router will be pug directly into the existing Nortel
Switch .
On the existing Baystack router I will create 4 new static routes for the new branch offices and the next hops --- the serial address of the resp branch routers.
Because the Baystack router at head office is only router it is already defined
as the default router , hence when packets are destining for any branch office
the will go to the Baystack  router which in turn will direct them to the
correct branch router.

With the plan outline above I was I thinking about a router to facilitate the  four new
branch traffic only and  more important the security of the traffic to and fro the proposed branches

The bulk of the work will be done by the Baystack  router ,----- have to research if
if it could handle this additional  work load.

This is my plan .
Please feel free to modify or suggest another less complicated method.

Thanks

 




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Question by:jomfra
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Expert Comment

by:calvinetter
ID: 17172966
>Were you suggesting this router be use in conjunction with the existing Baystack router or should I replace the Baystack and use the new 2811  router?
   Either way, it's really up to you.  But, the great advantage in using all Cisco routers: you don't have to mess with static routes, just setup EIGRP which is Cisco's very *fast*, solid, *proprietary* routing protocol (not supported by Baystack).  This becomes much more important as you add more branch offices & have more subnets to deal with.
  Whether you keep the Baystack depends on how old the Baystack is, how much more of a workload it can easily handle, if it has a spare ethernet interface to connect the Paradyne modem to, etc.

> On the existing Baystack router I will create 4 new static routes for the new branch offices and the next hops --- the serial address of the resp branch routers.
  If using both the Baystack & the new Cisco at HQ with static routes, here's how you'd need to set the routes:  for each of the branch office LANs the next hop would be the local IP of the new Cisco.  Then on the Cisco, it would have a static route for each of the branches pointing to the respective branch office router.  Example:
- Baystack LAN IP: 10.1.1.1  (on the head office internal LAN)
- new Cisco LAN IP: 10.1.1.2
- new Cisco DSL IP to Branch-A: 10.3.3.2
- Branch-A router DSL IP: 10.3.3.1
- Branch-A LAN: 192.168.5.0

On the Baystack:
- point a route for the 192.168.5.x subnet to 10.1.1.2 (Cisco)
On the new Cisco:
- point a route for the 192.168.5.x subnet to 10.3.3.1
On the branch office router:
- Point a route for the 10.1.1.x subnet to 10.3.3.2 (Cisco DSL), IF the Cisco isn't already it's default gateway.
- If you need a branch office to be able to reach another branch office, you'll also need a route statement for that other branch to also be pointing to the new Cisco.

Repeat the above for each of the branch offices.  Or, as I mentioned before, if you use all Cisco routers, it's much easier to add & maintain many branch offices if using EIGRP.  Another much less efficient option would be to use some other non-proprietary routing protocol like RIPv2 on the Baystack & the Cisco routers (assuming the Baystack supports RIPv2).

cheers
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Author Comment

by:jomfra
ID: 17174806
hello calvinetter,

when i did not get a reponse from you over the weekend
i send an amended question --- some how i felt i did not explain the
head office lay out properly .
but this response has taken into account all the missing links
allow me one  day to analysis this.
i will get back to you.
thanks  
0
 

Author Comment

by:jomfra
ID: 17175754
Hello Calvinetter,

After examining your response I check the baystack router, there is no spare Ethernet interface to connect the paradyne modem.
The only Ethernet interface is connect to the switch.

Forgive me, but I am new to this, hence all the questions.

  There are two reasons I would like to keep the baystack router ,  cost of
replacing all the baystck routers and the other is
question of not having the expertise to replace and configure the head office
and the other two large branch routers.
Remember in the existing environment there are three baystack router on the
Frame relay platform.
The of the nature of the organization  business is  down time is equated with lost of customers.
I do not want to take the risk.

  With the propose branch office because of their scale I could gradual introduce
Branch A ,test, if  okay introduce branch B test etc.
The propose  branches with a maximum of 4 workstations if the test for branch A
fails I resort to good old dail up until I am satisfy with the  router to router connections .
With the frame relay platform it is took risky for now until we have the expertise.

   Because of the above reasons my only aternative is to leave the baystack routers in place and try to design a plan using the existing physical resources.


Questions

1. Since the baystack router has no spare Ethernet inferface how can I incorporate
   the new cisco router , paradyne modem into the network to create the next hop
  and the branch routes as outline in your response?

2. Assuming that the baystack cannot handle the additional workload and will
    remain to service  existing configuration --- frame relay
    what do you suggest, for head office – propose
    branch connection using dedicated dsl?

   
   P.S, For the branch offices I already got approval for the cisco 871 routers, just I need
            to be clear on the head office requirements.    
   

   Thanks








 




I have two question : -
 
1.      Is it possible to connect the paradyne modem to the switch?

2.      Assuming  the baystack router cannot handle the workload , but will still be use to perform it current task – providing connection to the two larger branch on the
Frame relay platform ,
How should I configure the new cisco router to deal with the four new branch office only?


Hope you understand the questions above.
 


 


 
0
 

Author Comment

by:jomfra
ID: 17175820
hello calvinetter,

Ignore
>>  have two question : -
 
1.     Is it possible to connect the paradyne modem to the switch?

2.     Assuming  the baystack router cannot handle the workload , but will still be use to perform it current task – providing connection to the two larger branch on the
Frame relay platform ,
How should I configure the new cisco router to deal with the four new branch office only?

when i cut and paste response forgot to delete the part

>> The of the nature of the organization  business is  down time is equated with lost of customers.

should read

the nature of the organization  business is  down time is equated with lost of customers.

thanks


0
 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:calvinetter
ID: 17176142
1. >Since the baystack router has no spare Ethernet inferface how can I incorporate the new cisco router, paradyne modem into the network to create the next hop and the branch routes as outline in your response?
   Plug the new Cisco into the local LAN switch at HQ.  Another ethernet interface on this new Cisco will plug into the Paradyne DSL modem.

2. >Assuming that the baystack cannot handle the additional workload and will remain to service existing configuration...
  If you determine that the Baystack can't handle the extra load of routing traffic to/from the new branches, at the HQ office you'll want to consider changing the local default gateway (for the HQ LAN) to the IP of the new Cisco, & make the Baystack the default gateway of the new Cisco.  That way, traffic to/from the HQ & the new branch offices goes directly through the Cisco (bypassing the Baystack), & traffic can still flow between HQ & over frame relay to the largest branches.

>for head office... propose branch connection using dedicated dsl?
  Please clarify once & for all:  I believe in your original post you were going to be getting dedicated "private" DSL lines from each of the offices directly to the HQ - "private", as in "not over the Internet", but direct lines similar to a direct point-to-point T1.   Is this the case?

3. >Is it possible to connect the paradyne modem to the switch?
  Nope.  This is a *modem* not a router; a "modem" has to plug directly into a router or other layer-3 device.

4. >Assuming  the baystack router cannot handle the workload , but will still be use to perform it current task...providing connection to the two larger branch on the Frame relay platform, How should I configure the new cisco router to deal with the four new branch office only?
   See the response to question #2.

>> The of the nature of the organization  business is  down time is equated with lost of customers.
  Yes, that's what I understood.  ;)  If uptime is very critical, then you'll want to buy the "premium" SmartNet support on all the new Cisco routers - the "24x7 4-hr-response" SmartNet.  
   And this is another reason to consider to start replacing your oldest hardware, perhaps including the old Baystacks that are servicing the largest branches (via frame relay) with brand-new Cisco equipment.

cheers
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Author Comment

by:jomfra
ID: 17177415
hello calvinetter,

thanks for the response.

>>  Please clarify once & for all:  I believe in your original post you were going to be getting dedicated "private" DSL lines from each of the offices directly to the HQ - "private", as in "not over the Internet", but direct lines similar to a direct point-to-point T1.   Is this the case?

Yes this what i meant "private" direct lines similar to point to point T1.
sorry i omitted type  dsl
line .

thanks
0
 

Author Comment

by:jomfra
ID: 17179100
hello calvinetter,

Before i award you the point just a few clarifications

>>  If you determine that the Baystack can't handle the extra load of routing traffic to/from the new branches, at the HQ office you'll want to consider changing the local default gateway (for the HQ LAN) to the IP of the new Cisco, & make the Baystack the default gateway of the new Cisco.

how do configure this on my new cisco router?

>> - Baystack LAN IP: 10.1.1.1  (on the head office internal LAN)
- new Cisco LAN IP: 10.1.1.2
- new Cisco DSL IP to Branch-A: 10.3.3.2
- Branch-A router DSL IP: 10.3.3.1
- Branch-A LAN: 192.168.5.0

On the Baystack:
- point a route for the 192.168.5.x subnet to 10.1.1.2 (Cisco)
On the new Cisco:
- point a route for the 192.168.5.x subnet to 10.3.3.1
On the branch office router:
- Point a route for the 10.1.1.x subnet to 10.3.3.2 (Cisco DSL), IF the Cisco isn't already it's default gateway.

Will this configuration still apply if i set new cisco router as my default
for head office lan?

thanks
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Accepted Solution

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calvinetter earned 500 total points
ID: 17190341
Ok, thanks for clarification on the DSL lines... In that case, with multiple DSL connections coming into the HQ office, you've got 2 options:  
A) get a router (2811 or 2821) with at least enough Ethernet interfaces to support all your planned branches + 1 for the local HQ LAN connection, or  
B) get a Cisco layer-3 switch (Catalyst 3560 at least) - sort of like a router with a bunch of Ethernet interfaces, but unlike a router does *not* support NAT.  
  If you think you'll need to NAT traffic now or possibly in the future, go with a router.  Otherwise, note that if you go with the layer-3 switch, if you think you'll ever in the future want to use EIGRP, you must buy your switch with the EMI (aka "enhanced") IOS image; only the EMI image supports EIGRP & other advanced routing protocols.  The SMI or "standard" image only supports static routes & RIP routing protocol.

>how do configure this on my new cisco router?
  If configuring static routes, here's how your route statements would look like on the Cisco router(s), using my purely hypothetical previous example:

...On the new Cisco:
- point a route for the 192.168.5.x subnet to 10.3.3.1:
  ip route 192.168.5.0 255.255.255.0 10.3.3.1

On the branch office router (assuming Cisco):
- Point a route for the 10.1.1.x subnet to 10.3.3.2 (Cisco DSL), IF the Cisco isn't already it's default gateway:
  ip route 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 10.3.3.2

>Will this configuration still apply if i set new cisco router as my default for head office lan?
  Not quite.  On the current HQ Baystack, you wouldn't need to add a static route for the branches that the new Cisco would handle, IF the new Cisco is the default gateway for the Baystack.  
  Remember this rule of thumb: if a router needs to get to a certain network, as long as its default gateway has a way to get to the desired destination, you won't need to tell your local router how to get there; once your local router finds that it doesn't have a specific route for the destination network, it essentially gives up & just forwards the traffic to its default gateway.

cheers
0
 

Author Comment

by:jomfra
ID: 17191857
hello calvinetter,
 whoa it was great open this ouestions and anwers session.
I have learn a lot and must say i am better equipt to impleament head office - branch connection.

thanks for all the assistance .
thank you
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LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:calvinetter
ID: 17198301
You're welcome! Good luck!
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