Using setdefault to update that value of an int

I've recently been introducted to the setdefault function, and understand it can be used in the following way to update a dict's value, when that value is an array:

myDict.setdefault(myKey, []).append(myValue)

But how can I use setdefault to update the value of a dict, when that value is an int? For instance, the following statement gives me an error mesage:

myDict.setdefault(myKey, 0) += 1


Thanks!
BerkeleyJeffAsked:
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RichieHindleConnect With a Mentor Commented:
That idiom only really works with mutable values.  With immutable values like integers, there's no way to avoid a separate get and set.  Here's one way to do it:

myDict[myKey] = myDict.get(myKey, 0) + 1

You can always break it out into a function:

def inc(d, k):
    d[k] = d.get(k, 0) + 1

myDict = {}
myKey = 'k'
inc(myDict, myKey)
print myDict
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BerkeleyJeffAuthor Commented:
It's too bad Python doesn't have a builtin function for that. It's such a common task, I would think that would have included it.

Is there a mutable int type, like what "Integer" is to "int" in Java? Maybe I could halve the number of dict accesses that way.
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RichieHindleCommented:
No, there's no mutable integer type.  You could write one, but it wouldn't make any appreciable difference - rather than two dictionary accesses, you'd have one dictionary access plus an object attribute access (which is a dictionary access under the hood anyway).
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BerkeleyJeffAuthor Commented:
Thank you.
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