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NAS storage device and Backups

I want to get a NAS storage box for backing up 3 servers.  How do they work.  If I buy the Maxtor Shared Storage II how does the security work?  Is it setup like a ftp server, or like a network drive?

 Is there a NAS that will let me use the domain to set permissions.  
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2013

Commented:
This is not necessarily a good idea.  How do you take it off site?  What are you doing for off-site backups?  NAS devices - except for the REALLY expensive models - are usually not worth the money - a cheap server or simply adding disks - internally or externally - is usually a cheaper more efficient solution.

I would suggest reading over my backup comment - that I turned into a web page it got so long.
http://www.lwcomputing.com/tips/static/backup.asp

Author

Commented:
I wanted to buy 2 of the maxtor 500 network drives and swap them out every week.  I would keep as many backups as would fit on each.  I know this is not an ideal backup system.  Your webpage has some good reading thanks for the info.  I am really just curious about the setup on these low end NAS drives from maxtor.

Commented:
The Buffalo LinkStation and TeraStation NAS units will configure for workgroup or domain.  You can set them up for both FTP and network server drives.  I've got two of these in place right now and have found them to be excellent little workhorses.  The LinkStations even let you add a secondary USB drive to them, which you can configure as a backup drive to the main.  

I've got servers in two buildings quite a distance from each other.  I use the one in building B to back up the servers in building A, the one in building A to back up the servers in building B.  And, they back themselves up to their external USB drives.  Works very well.
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2013

Commented:
Is there a reason you apparently don't want to use external USB hard drives?
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2013

Commented:
External USB hard drives are cheaper, easier to setup, easily use permissions (though you SHOULD be using some form of Backup Software, even if it's the NTBACKUP program included in Windows), can be easily swapped off site, are faster (unless you have a gigabit network), and can overall provide a better backup.  Your resistance to anything other than NAS is perplexing.

My friend has a maxtor NAS device (he's got this tendency to buy things he thinks looks cool... then I burst his bubble when I explain how he just wasted his money.  They do not have domain capability - they have their own user accounts.

Author

Commented:

I was considering NAS for the speed.  After reading some I might of made a wrong assumption.  

Is a USB 2.0 drive faster or as fast as a NAS box?  
Technology and Business Process Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2013
Commented:
I'm confident in the sustained throughput rates EXCEPT the ones I say "ROUGH estimate" on.  Those aside, keep in mind, WHAT are you backing up?  Lots of small files won't matter - they backup slowly.  a FEW HUGE files will backup fast (if they aren't fragmented).

NAS on 10/100 network connection:
100 Mbit/Sec MAX Throughput
80 Mbit/Sec Sustained Throughput where there were NO OTHER network traffic that could interfere

SDLT Tape
283.2 Mbit/Sec MAX Throughput
150-200 Mbit/Sec Sustained Throughput (ROUGH estimate).

USB2
480 Mbit/Sec MAX Throughput
160-200 Mbit/Sec Sustained Throughput

Firewire
400 Mbit/Sec MAX Throughput
200-240 Mbit/Sec Sustained Throughput

Firewire2
800 Mbit/Sec MAX Throughput
400-500 Mbit/Sec Sustained Throughput (ROUGH estimate).

NAS on GbE Network (assuming both the NAS and servers support Gb)
1000 Mbit/Sec MAX Throughput
150-300 Mbit/Sec Sustained Throughput (Most "cheap" GbE devices I've seen don't get anywhere NEAR the Gigabit speeds sustained).