How to display only the folder belong to a respective group, and hide the non related folders



On a Windows 2003 domain.

Suppose I create a folder called  folder1   (ie :  D:\folder1 )

Under this shared folder of D:\folder1  , there are 4 folders :-

   D:\folder1\Sales
   D:\folder1\Engineers
   D:\folder1\HR
   D:\folder1\Planners

I want to create a map drive for these departments (Sales, Engineers, HR and Planners),
such that when they mapped to folder, they can only see own folder .

That is if Sales user mapped to  \\servername  , only the Sales folder can seen by Sales users.

Engineers can see only their own .  and those folder not related to them, are all hidden .

Thank you
star404Asked:
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Steve AgnewSr. Systems EngineerCommented:
I don't think it works that way.. other than the $ extension that hides it altogether.. their is a (L)LIST property and you could try to setup denies, but I wouldn't recommend that you'll probably only end up generating errors for everyone that tries to browse.. I just tested this out.. it still showed the folder..

Generally if you can open a folder, you'll be able to see it's contents (with windows), you just won't be able to open one you don't have access to.  If you don't want people seeing what they shouldn't I would just create hidden shares (name$ with a '$' at the end of the share name) and then they have to manually type in the name to map to it.. if you want people to be able to browse, I'm pretty sure you're going to have to let them see the folder name and if they don't have access to it and try to open it- they just get Access Denied.
dooleydogCommented:
unless ou make different shares for each group, you are stuck with this.

It is more visually organized for you but not necessarily better, just different.

Good Luck,

Fatal_ExceptionSystems EngineerCommented:
This is one problem that MS is addressing in their new server releases.. but with 2003, you cannot hide shares from users (except for the already noted $ hidden share)...  Novell has this ability, but Windows does not...  YET!
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grayeCommented:
so, just create a set of mapped drive letter using the full path (beyond the share)

Let's assume Folder1 is shared as "Departments"...

for the sales group, you'd create a mapped drive like this:

         net use q: \\ServerName\Departments\Sales
for Engineers, it'd be:
         net use q: \\ServerName\Departments\Engineers
etc...

Yes, you can create a mapped drive "deeper" than just the top level share.

From drive Q:, the sales folks would not be able to see or navigate to the other folders
johnb6767Commented:
Personally, I would combine the advice from graye, but instead of Sharing the departments folder, share the subfolders for the depts as hidden shares ( as deadnight suggested). That way when you map

net use q: \\servername\departments\sales$
 and
net use q: \\servername\departments\engineers$

When anyone goes to \\servername\departments they shouldnt see the hidden shares....only what was provided them via mapping...

Here is some help on hidden shares..
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=314984
Steve AgnewSr. Systems EngineerCommented:
I really don't like hidden shares as it generally increases the amount of support required by your end users as they will insist that it 'isn't working' I think it best if they are going to be mapping shares that they can see and they just can't access the ones they shouldn't.  It isn't perfect and generally you simply need to weigh the ability of your end users, if their technical skill is low, better to have things they can 'see' if it's high then go ahead and hide the shares to keep the 'busy body' users from harassing you with 'why can't I....'

Ultimately with the current hidden share $ or just folders with permissions it who your end users are and your relationship with them that should let you know which direction to go.. until MS comes out with something new.. (but I try to avoid the bleeding edge of technology)  I still like to use Server 2000 whenever possible as it generally has less compatilibity issues than all the newer versions.. the only thing I've found overly useful with Server 2003 is shadow copy and thus only use server 2003 for file servers currently.

I'm behind a firewall and am not concerned about my users hacking my servers, I'd rather my servers be reliable than secure due to my enviornment and my users.. your situation could be different..

But that's my Sep.11 monday morning 'the way I see it' rant.. you guys have a great day - and thanks for listening.  Peace
techtommyCommented:
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=04A563D9-78D9-4342-A485-B030AC442084&displaylang=en

I believe this is what you are looking for to hide unaccessible folders within a single share.

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