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Migrate AD to new server

Posted on 2006-09-12
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
I need to replace a clients server - too be honest it's a desktop PC with SBS2003. They've had nothing but trouble with it and we're now going to replace it with a HP Proliant ML310. This is going to be totally different hardware so it's a completely new install. I would like to try and set the new server up keeping the existing user and computer accounts as I would rather not have to go around each PC to rejoin the domain.

I'm sure I can find this out from Microsoft's site but I'd like some real life experiences of what to look out for and how best to migrate AD to the new server.

Some users and using offline folders and others have folder redirection etc and I'm hoping to retain all this by migrating AD.

Cheers
Mike
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Question by:barnesm6
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasy earned 250 total points
ID: 17508056
You have four options:

1.  Use Microsoft's migration method (http://sbsurl.com/migrate).  This will require that you create a new domain name as part of the transition.

2.  Migrate Manually.  ie, set up the new server and re-add all of the users manually.  If there are less than 10 users or so, this isn't a bad idea... especially if there are wrong configurations to begin with.  You would use EXMerge to migrate the mailboxes (http://sbsurl.com/exmerge), and files can be moved using a USB Hard drive, or just copy the files to a drive on one of the workstations so you can copy them back to the new server.

3.  Backup with Acronis True Image Server 9.0 with Universal Restore and then restore to your new server.
http://download.acronis.com/pdf/rg/atis9.1_rg.en.pdf#search=%22paragon%20drive%20backup%20restore%20to%20different%20hardware%22
A pricey option, but it works beautifully.

4.  www.sbsmigration.com The SBS Professional's Community choice for this type of migration.  (my choice as well)  The benefits of the Swing Migration method that SBSMigration will provide the documentation for are tremendous... you can perform the migration at your own pace.  There is now downtime on the network, no late nights thrying to make sure things are working before everyone gets in at 8:00am, complete roll-back, wrap-around documentation that will be able to stay with the network, etc, etc.

I've used all four options and really like the Swing Migration the best.  The only time I don't do this is for situations as stated in Option #2.

Jeff
TechSoEasy

***UPDATED 11/16/2007 by TechSoEasy -- EE's Microsoft Zone Advisor***
There is a newly published document for migrating SBS 2003 to new hardware:  http://sbsurl.com/newhardware
 
Be aware though, that if your original SBS is an OEM license you need to buy a new license for the new machine.
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by:barnesm6
ID: 17570485
OK they've only got 6-7 users so I think it might be simpler just to recreate the accounts and start again. My only concern is reconnecting the computers/users to the new server.

I've set the new server up with the same domain, name etc. When I remove the old server and connect this one how would you suggest connecting the clients to the new server? I've previously come a cropper when disjoining a computer from the domain and then rejoining - disjoining removed the users profile from the client pc along with all of their data.

Someone has suggested that simply removing the .local from the end of the domain when connecting the old fashioned way will work but I attempted this on a test system and it didn't work for me.

Cheers
Mike
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by:Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasy
ID: 17570682
No, don't do what "someone" has suggested... a bad idea because the workstations will never be correctly part of your "SBS" network.  Remember, SBS has a lot of useful tools that will only work if you configure your network properly.

In most cases, unjoining the workstations and then rejoining them would allow you to still use the user's profile as long as you use the same usernames.  But just in case, there is a plan B... so when you are ready to switch over, here are the steps:

1. Use the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard to back up the user's profile.  The backup can just be done to the C: drive of that workstation.
2. Unjoin the workstations from the current domain
3. Delete the C:\Program Files\Micrososft Small Business Server\Clients folder
4. Make sure that DHCP is enabled (Get IP Address Automatically)
5. Reboot
6. Log in with the workstation's BUILTIN administrator account
7. Use the http://servername/connectcomputer wizard to rejoin the network.
8. Select the correct user to assign to the computer and have connectcomputer migrate the profile.
9. If you aren't given the option to migrate the profile, select NONE and then restore it with the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard.

That should be all you need!

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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by:barnesm6
ID: 17571715
Thanks for the speedy response Jeff. Nice step by step guide and all sounds so obvious when it's presented like that.

Anyway, replacing the server tomorrow so I'll let you know how it goes.
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by:barnesm6
ID: 17573110
I've been reading up on the FSTW and from what I can see it will backup outlook express settings but I see no mention of outlook settings or mail store (my clients are using local pop3 accounts in Outlook). However, I see that you can select additional folders to back up which means I could backup the pst file but it still doesn't help with having to recreate the users account in outlook later.

I have also been looking at the User state migration tool and this migrates outlook and oe settings and mail stores. Would you agree that I would be better off using this tool instead?
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by:Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasy
ID: 17573145
You don't need to worry about Outlook settings... because you don't want to restore those.  You want your NEW SBS to handle the Outlook configuration... and move them off of individual POP3 accounts to having the SBS's Exchange POP3 Connector download their mail.  Using the POP3 Connector will allow users to access their email remotely via Outlook Web Access and it will allow you to back it up centrally on the server as well as provide virus protection at the server level.

USMT is not necessary here because again... you want SBS to do it's stuff.  If you had individual POP3 accounts before, you didn't have a very well deployed network... spend more of your time reading up on SBS Best Practices and you'll be much happier with this.  :-)  

A good source:  http://sbsurl.com/techguide

And good books:  http://sbsurl.com/best http://sbsurl.com/unleashed

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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