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Mister_SpockFlag for United States of America

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Audio Digitizer

I am currently looking at the InstantMusic Vinyl & Cassette Ripper audio digitizer. It is a $50 item I found on the ThinkGeek website. I have tried software solutions that claim to do the same thing but will only convert music into WMA. This is combination hardware and software solution and looks like it does what I need it to do. I want to know if anyone has any experience with this or something similar.
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Wesley Lennon
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I use MusicMatch Jukebox 10 Plus to rip from LP's, Cassette Tapes and old 8-Track tapes using an SoundBlaster X-Fi or the Audigy 2 ZS Platinum.

When using Musicmatch, you can set the recording box to Line In and automatically converts to the file system you choose, I use MP3 at 192.

www.musicmatch.com

Thanks,

Wes
I use the free version of wavepad. http://www.nch.com.au/wavepad/masters.html with an MAUDIO soundcard.
Do you have a sound card with line in? thats all you need plus the software.
Give us the model of your sound card or motherboard with onboard sound.
The USB solution that you had in mind may not be fast enough if you have a usb1.1 interface,  I would still avoid USB as they are more problematic than a sound card solution.
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CarlosMMartins

Use your audio in and audacity (free software).
http://audacity.sourceforge.net/
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ASKER

I've tried a couple of the software solutions mentioned, and I appreciate the feedback. I am looking at a hardware solution for a client who has specified the exact hardware in the contract. I realize a USB connection is not the most desirable and I have explained this to my client, but that is the constraint I am working under. Really good suggestions for far though, but has anyone had any experience with InstantMusic Vinyl & Cassette Ripper audio digitizer or something similar?
Well, I think most people with some "tech" level would prefer doing it using the available tools (that they probably already have).

Nearly every pc has an audio in, if you use get the audio from an amp, to avoid the problems of interfacing to a disc player directly, then it's just the matter of using software to clean the recording as much as possible. There are some "hiss & pop " filters to help with old recordings.

Having said that, I never tried the device you mentioned... And I agree it might be a "nice" solution for anyone looking for a simple approach.

Being USB doesn't mean nothing, USB is more than capable to stream audio around. Of course, no $50 solution will get you a "professional" result... but depending on what he needs, it might be more than adequate.
If its hardware you are looking for we need more specs as far as the type of I/O connections that will be used to pull the audio down. I assume you are pulling down an analog signal and converting to digital?
More than likely its a portability issue if hes looking for USB, most high end components that would be used for this are firewire.
If it's the portability issue, you could also have a look at the external USB Creative Soundcards - not that I like their overbloated drivers, but...
:)
The client is my church; the contract is verbal from a committee for the Audio\Visual group. Like most churches we are taking advantage of technology becoming affordable and using a digital projector, PC’s etc. We are looking at the hardware solution to convert old tapes of past services into CD’s. We have a large soundboard that we will be getting an analog signal from to convert to digital. Does this help?
If the computer you'll use to do the recording already has a soundcard, then you probably don't need any extra hardware.

As for the software, any basic audio software (even the free ones) will do what you need.
You might want to look around to try and find the most "user friendly" one...
Even though, in any software it's usually "press record"... "stop" at the end, and "save" the file... not much to it.
Video tapes or audio tapes?
I have already tried that, both mono and RCA jacks. The trouble is I can only sample all of the tracks on a song. For example, I am trying to digitize a song from a tape that is done by one person. To make the song sound like it is sung by multiple people, he records different tracks and puts them all together. He has also done this with different musical instruments. There is a different track for each voice and instrument. I have not been able to capture all tracks so it is like listening to a song designed for stereo sound using just a mono playback.  I have done some research on the subject that looks like a USB powered solution might be able to handle what I am trying to do.  
Oh, so you're talking about muti-track recordings.
I'm not sure I understood exactly what you said.

He has multiple track recordings done, with several tracks (voice, other voice, instruments, drums, etc, in each different track)?
And, what do you want to have in the PC? The mixed output (that wouldn't be too hard) or each track on it's own separate audio file?

For that, you'd need to either, record each track separately (it would take a lot of time!) ot have a sound card capable of multiple track input recording - which will take you to the professional area of soundcards.

From audacity: http://audacity.sourceforge.net/about/features
===
Recording

Audacity can record live audio through a microphone or mixer, or digitize recordings from cassette tapes, vinyl records, or minidiscs. With some sound cards, it can also capture streaming audio.

    * Record from microphone, line input, or other sources.
    * Dub over existing tracks to create multi-track recordings.
    * Record up to 16 channels at once (requires multi-channel hardware).
    * Level meters can monitor volume levels before, during, and after recording.
===

So, you can use record up to 16 tracks, as long as you have the required hardware.



This is getting a bit confusing, Are you recording each track individually or are you trying to separate the tracks for digitzing and then remixing them.
No, I trying to record them all at once. The songs from this person are the only ones that I have tried so far. Is this the way that most recordings are, or is this unique?
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CarlosMMartins

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