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Weird DNS(?) problem

I recently changed my webhost and for some reason it seems like something is storing a memory of the DNS somewhere.

mail.mydomain.com still takes me to my old mail server however testing it on any remote box, mail.mydomain.com takes me to the correct new server.

has anyone encountered a problem like this?

I tested several machines on the same network and they take me to the OLD one.
But any remote machine not of the same network take me to the NEW one.

Thanks.. any help is appreciated.
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flam79
Asked:
flam79
1 Solution
 
nickmarshallCommented:
Hi,

A couple of things that are worth checking.  Firstly the record may be cached on your ISP's DNS servers.  Your ISP may have a particularly long TTL (Time To Live) on their DNS which will eventually run out and you will see the new site.  If your ISP's TTL is very very long, it may be worth using the DNS servers of your new hosting company.  Simply do a whois lookup on your domain and then use their DNS servers within your ADSL router.

Have you rebooted your ADSL router to clear any cache that may exist?

Also check the hosts file on your PC to make sure that an entry does not exist for mail.mydomain.com.  You can find this within the Windows\system32\drivers\etc folder.

Hope this helps!

www.messagestream.com
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rjf79068Commented:
You say you changed webhosts ... but you didn't say you changed mail providers.

DNS stores seperate records for web sites (A records) and mail delivery (MX records (Mail eXchanger)).

Unless you changed the MX record too, you'll get email delivered to your old server.

You can do an nslookup against a root server and it should provide with "less outdated" MX record.

You could also verify with your new webhost that the MX record was changed.
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flam79Author Commented:
resetting modem didn't work..., thanks for the suggestion though nickmarshall. you're probably right about the ISP DNS server. That was my guess but I didn't think they would do that. I guess it's suppose to speed things up? Who knows.

rjf79068 - I stated "mail.mydomain.com still takes me to my old mail server however testing it on any remote box, mail.mydomain.com takes me to the correct new server."

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rjf79068Commented:
sorry...somehow i missed that line the first time  :-o
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cslack1313Commented:
If I understand this correctly, you need to change your internal DNS as well. Are you running active directory, IIS Server? I"m sure you have a host file related to your webserver. Even though your ISP has changed it, internally you will hit the old one until you make the change. Hope this helps
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FixingStuffCommented:
Use a DNS DIG utility on the host name.  Dig will tell you where it gets it answer from to help diagnose. If you are on a Unix of any flavor, it is a built in command. For Windows, there are many free dig utils available.
Also, assuming Windows... you have flushed DNS cache, right?...  ipconfig /flushdns

FS-
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