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Which config files should be backed up on fedora 5

Hello EE, I  plan to re install a box running  Fedora 5 and

squid, iptables, samba.  

My question is what config files should  I backup to allow me to restore the settings as they were.  I know about.

squid.conf, writing iptables, smb.conf.  what other config files should I backup?
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aduhwale
Asked:
aduhwale
2 Solutions
 
Kerem ERSOYPresidentCommented:
Hi,

to backup the whole etc is a good idea. Then you ould restore it someplace else on the new system and copy the necessary files as needed.

when I transfer a system I generally create a tar including

/etc
/root
/var/spool/mail    (just in case you want to keep the content of the mailboxes)
/var/log              (if you need your previous logs)
/home                (if there are several users etc.)
/var/www          (web pages etc.)

any customized diectory peculiar to your setup...

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kyle_in_taiwanCommented:
Other suggestions:  have easily on hand the /etc/yum and ~/yum.conf, because you may need those during the installation process (or immediatetly after), and it may be a good idea to backup /etc/fstab also (if you have a lot of partitions).  

Typically i just copy the entire /etc tree  to the /home directory -- which i always have on a separate partition -- so that when i do a re-install i can simply allow the installation program to put the new /home on the new /root partition, and then i manually replace all the old .* files in the various user directories (after first backing them up).   Consequently, i always have all these files immediately handy during the install process, should i feel the need to call them up.

Also, there are occaisionally  things in /usr/src or in the /usr directory tree that you want to keep;  /usr/include, /usr/local, /usr/local/include and /usr/share sometimes have manually installed things and/or config files that you might want to back up.

Definitely back up the entire /etc tree, though;  it's not large, and there are too many useful things there you might want to keep.

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aduhwaleAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the responses.  I have split the points as I got my answer from both.  KeremE, gave most of the answer and I checked /usr based on Kyle's advice.
Thanks again.
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