Go Premium for a chance to win a PS4. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

multiple ip addresses

Posted on 2006-10-21
2
Medium Priority
?
282 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-27
I've added some ip address such as

added to the /etc/hosts file

10.1.3.10     server1
10.1.3.11     server2
10.1.3.12     server3
10.1.3.13     server4
10.1.3.14     server5
10.1.3.15     server6

I plumed the interface and brought them up.

How do I set these so they come back up when reboot since these use a different netmask and broadcast than my regular IP address

I can add hostname files such as

/etc/hostname.hme0


question I have is how will it know the netmask and broadcast I need to use with these such as

255.255.255.0   and  10.1.3.255

is there a way to add this to the netmask file?

Thanks,

0
Comment
Question by:bt707
2 Comments
 
LVL 10

Accepted Solution

by:
Nukfror earned 2000 total points
ID: 17781219
Just setup a /etc/hostname.hme0:1 as:
10.1.3.10

Setup /etc/hostname.hme0:2 as:
10.1.3.11

and so on.

Generally you setup the netmask in /etc/netmasks:

10.1.3.0 255.255.255.0
0
 

Author Comment

by:bt707
ID: 17782101
Thanks Nukfror
0

Featured Post

New feature and membership benefit!

New feature! Upgrade and increase expert visibility of your issues with Priority Questions.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

I have been running these systems for a few years now and I am just very happy with them.   I just wanted to share the manual that I have created for upgrades and other things.  Oooh yes! FreeBSD makes me happy (as a server), no maintenance and I al…
Introduction Regular patching is part of a system administrator's tasks. However, many patches require that the system be in single-user mode before they can be installed. A cluster patch in particular can take quite a while to apply if the machine…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…
Suggested Courses
Course of the Month9 days, 7 hours left to enroll

879 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question