Solved

Increase C: drive size

Posted on 2006-10-21
7
653 Views
Last Modified: 2010-08-05
Here is the situation I have inherited,

200 Server standard with Perc 4e/Di Raid Controller. DELL Poweredge 2800

2- 136 GB SCSI ,
1- 73GB SCSI

C: drive was partioned to 10 GB - I know way tooooooo small!

E: drive partition: 126 GB - (101 GB free)

How can I increase the C: partition size partition?

Thanks,

Frank
0
Comment
Question by:flteng56
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
7 Comments
 
LVL 95

Expert Comment

by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 17780874
10GB C: drive - PERFECT size.

Unless this is a terminal server.

Expanding a server's C: drive can be a dangerous thing... instead, you should be moving services OFF the C: drive and putting them on other drives.  For 99% of servers that are not Application mode Terminal Servers, 10GB is JUST FINE.
0
 

Author Comment

by:flteng56
ID: 17780901
Hi leew,

I have moved the pagefiles, Exchange database /logfiles to E:, removed non essential programs. The problem is the C: drive is down to 563 MB.

FRank
0
 
LVL 5

Assisted Solution

by:hbz
hbz earned 250 total points
ID: 17781033

I agree with leew.  10G should be enough.  Do a search of the entire drive for recent files (hit F3, and set the search for files modified within the week/month).  You may find:

Log files for IIS
Data files for SQL
Log files for AntiVirus
Other log files
Files for your backup software
... etc.

-- hbz
0
Netscaler Common Configuration How To guides

If you use NetScaler you will want to see these guides. The NetScaler How To Guides show administrators how to get NetScaler up and configured by providing instructions for common scenarios and some not so common ones.

 

Author Comment

by:flteng56
ID: 17781158
Hi guys,

The problem with C: is it is down to 563 MB now.
0
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:hbz
ID: 17781356

Yes, we understand that there is not much space left on C:\  The question is:  What is taking up all the space?  As leew and I have said, 10G really should be sufficient for your operating system and a few applications.  So what is taking up all the space?  You need to find out and tell us!

- hbz
0
 

Author Comment

by:flteng56
ID: 17781432
I will perform the search and investigate. I will post back with the results. Thanks guys for info.
0
 
LVL 95

Accepted Solution

by:
Lee W, MVP earned 250 total points
ID: 17781785
Do you use Volume Shadow copy?  BackupExec on this machine?  Content Indexing Service?  IIS with FTP?  NTbackup

I usually recommend downloading the tool DIRUSE from Microsoft - it can, through a command line, display the sizes of every folder on the drive.  The command I usually run is DIRUSE C:\ /* /, /M

Then you can determine the size of each folder and progressively narrow down the location of the used space.

hbz has given good ideas for locating possible reasons, others include:
*Volume Shadow Copy - if it's configured to save data to the same drive System Volume Information
*Content Indexing service - stores files in System Volume Information
*NTBackup Logs - stored, I believe in the all users profile.
*Backup Exec - some versions store data in the System Volume Information folder and can fail to remove it
*Temp folders (I had a script that did backups and it would sometimes fail to delete the temp file which I stored in the %temp% folder, leaving behind 100 MB temp files - 10 of these and you've used up a gig
*Temporary Internet Files (if you've downloaded things; I find the default settings insane and set them instead to 1 MB limit for these files)
*Downloaded packages for manual updates, service packs, patches, ISO images, etc that may be in a My Documents folder or on the desktop or somewhere else.
*bounced email from Exchange
*Note: this is NOT a complete list, but rather some of the more likely and less thought of possibilities

Again, DIRUSE will help you narror things down - you can run it repeatedly to get to the exact folder(s) that takes so much space.  I would expect, even with SQL Server, Exchange, AD, DNS, DHCP, Antivirus, and a couple of other server related programs, I would expect you to have 4-6 GB used, and 4-6 GB free on a 10 GB partition.
0

Featured Post

Best Practices: Disaster Recovery Testing

Besides backup, any IT division should have a disaster recovery plan. You will find a few tips below relating to the development of such a plan and to what issues one should pay special attention in the course of backup planning.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Recently, I had the need to build a standalone system to run a point-of-sale system. I’m running this on a low-voltage Atom processor, so I wanted a light-weight operating system, but still needed Windows. I chose to use Microsoft Windows Server 200…
I've always wanted to allow a user to have a printer no matter where they login. The steps below will show you how to achieve just that. In this Article I'll show how to deploy printers automatically with group policy and then using security fil…
This video shows how to quickly and easily add an email signature for all users on Exchange 2016. The resulting signature is applied on a server level by Exchange Online. The email signature template has been downloaded from: www.mail-signatures…
This video shows how to use Hyena, from SystemTools Software, to bulk import 100 user accounts from an external text file. View in 1080p for best video quality.

770 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question