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Increase C: drive size

Here is the situation I have inherited,

200 Server standard with Perc 4e/Di Raid Controller. DELL Poweredge 2800

2- 136 GB SCSI ,
1- 73GB SCSI

C: drive was partioned to 10 GB - I know way tooooooo small!

E: drive partition: 126 GB - (101 GB free)

How can I increase the C: partition size partition?

Thanks,

Frank
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flteng56
Asked:
flteng56
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2 Solutions
 
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
10GB C: drive - PERFECT size.

Unless this is a terminal server.

Expanding a server's C: drive can be a dangerous thing... instead, you should be moving services OFF the C: drive and putting them on other drives.  For 99% of servers that are not Application mode Terminal Servers, 10GB is JUST FINE.
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flteng56Author Commented:
Hi leew,

I have moved the pagefiles, Exchange database /logfiles to E:, removed non essential programs. The problem is the C: drive is down to 563 MB.

FRank
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hbzCommented:

I agree with leew.  10G should be enough.  Do a search of the entire drive for recent files (hit F3, and set the search for files modified within the week/month).  You may find:

Log files for IIS
Data files for SQL
Log files for AntiVirus
Other log files
Files for your backup software
... etc.

-- hbz
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flteng56Author Commented:
Hi guys,

The problem with C: is it is down to 563 MB now.
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hbzCommented:

Yes, we understand that there is not much space left on C:\  The question is:  What is taking up all the space?  As leew and I have said, 10G really should be sufficient for your operating system and a few applications.  So what is taking up all the space?  You need to find out and tell us!

- hbz
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flteng56Author Commented:
I will perform the search and investigate. I will post back with the results. Thanks guys for info.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Do you use Volume Shadow copy?  BackupExec on this machine?  Content Indexing Service?  IIS with FTP?  NTbackup

I usually recommend downloading the tool DIRUSE from Microsoft - it can, through a command line, display the sizes of every folder on the drive.  The command I usually run is DIRUSE C:\ /* /, /M

Then you can determine the size of each folder and progressively narrow down the location of the used space.

hbz has given good ideas for locating possible reasons, others include:
*Volume Shadow Copy - if it's configured to save data to the same drive System Volume Information
*Content Indexing service - stores files in System Volume Information
*NTBackup Logs - stored, I believe in the all users profile.
*Backup Exec - some versions store data in the System Volume Information folder and can fail to remove it
*Temp folders (I had a script that did backups and it would sometimes fail to delete the temp file which I stored in the %temp% folder, leaving behind 100 MB temp files - 10 of these and you've used up a gig
*Temporary Internet Files (if you've downloaded things; I find the default settings insane and set them instead to 1 MB limit for these files)
*Downloaded packages for manual updates, service packs, patches, ISO images, etc that may be in a My Documents folder or on the desktop or somewhere else.
*bounced email from Exchange
*Note: this is NOT a complete list, but rather some of the more likely and less thought of possibilities

Again, DIRUSE will help you narror things down - you can run it repeatedly to get to the exact folder(s) that takes so much space.  I would expect, even with SQL Server, Exchange, AD, DNS, DHCP, Antivirus, and a couple of other server related programs, I would expect you to have 4-6 GB used, and 4-6 GB free on a 10 GB partition.
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