Solved

printf int in binary format

Posted on 2006-10-22
15
22,924 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-15
How to printf integer, byte etc in their binary format?
0
Comment
Question by:william007
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • +1
15 Comments
 
LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
Comment Utility
what do you mean when you say "in their binary format"?
0
 
LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
Comment Utility
are you asking about %x
0
 
LVL 9

Author Comment

by:william007
Comment Utility
Hi, let say int i=4;
%x will be printing as hex form 4
But what I want is the binary form which is the 0100.
0
 
LVL 45

Accepted Solution

by:
sunnycoder earned 300 total points
Comment Utility
0
 
LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
Comment Utility
there is no standard printf format to do that.
you could write a function to do that.
How are you deciding how many leading 0s are in the binary form?
0
 
LVL 9

Author Comment

by:william007
Comment Utility
Hi ozo,
For the leading 0s I will consider omitted it.
But if we must write a function, then I would suggest to make it as a flag in the argument.
0
 
LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
Comment Utility
how should the flag be interpreted?
0
Get up to 2TB FREE CLOUD per backup license!

An exclusive Black Friday offer just for Expert Exchange audience! Buy any of our top-rated backup solutions & get up to 2TB free cloud per system! Perform local & cloud backup in the same step, and restore instantly—anytime, anywhere. Grab this deal now before it disappears!

 
LVL 2

Assisted Solution

by:avsrivastava
avsrivastava earned 200 total points
Comment Utility
This is a function I wrote sometime back, can be used to print in any base(between 2 and 36).
for base >36, we need more symbols than just numbers and alphabets.
maxwidth is the size of the dest buffer.

char * toString(int num, char * dest, unsigned radix, unsigned  maxwidth)
{
        if(!dest)
                return dest;
        if (radix < 2 || radix > 36)
        {
                dest[0] = 0;
                return dest;
        }

        int out = num;
        unsigned len = 0, i =0;
        int rem;

        while(out&& len<maxwidth)
        {
                rem = out % radix;
                out =  out/radix;
                if (rem > 9)
                        dest[len] = (char)(rem - 10) + 'a';
                else
                        dest[len] = (char)rem + '0';

                ++len;
        }

        if(!len)
                dest[len++]='0';//for number 0

        dest[len] = 0;

        // reverse digits
        for (i = 0; i < (len >> 1); ++i)
        {
                char c = dest[i];
                dest[i] = dest[len-1-i];
                dest[len-1-i] = c;
        }
}
0
 
LVL 9

Author Comment

by:william007
Comment Utility
>how should the flag be interpreted?
Something like convertToBinary(char omitZeroflag...
and check the omitZeroflag to decide whether we want to omit zero...
Since this is just a on and off switch..in Java we can use boolean, but I don't really confirm that what is the best way to implement in C(Can someone tell me what is the best way to do a on and off switch in C?).  Anyway, I think I have got many good idea to get the binary here, thanks for the question:)

0
 
LVL 2

Assisted Solution

by:avsrivastava
avsrivastava earned 200 total points
Comment Utility
>>How are you deciding how many leading 0s are in the binary form?
You did not mention the number of zeros you want. (there is no straight answer to this, it is best not to display any leading zeros or always display fixed width numbers; say 32 or 64 digits)

BTW, the function I posted works for unsigned numbers, negative numbers will get printed in 2's compliment format.

There is a miss-by-one error in the while loop condition,
it should be
while(out && len<maxwidth-1)

0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:avsrivastava
Comment Utility
>Can someone tell me what is the best way to do a on and off switch in C?
usually an int is used(0 = false, anything else = true)

if you include stdbool.h, then you can use the bool datatype in C.

however, for most systems bool is not guaranteed to be 1 byte (can be as large as 8 bytes on some old systems),
till sometime back, the only thing you could assume was that size of bool <= size of long.
Though on latest versions on gcc, it is 1 byte.
0
 
LVL 9

Author Comment

by:william007
Comment Utility
>usually an int is used(0 = false, anything else = true)
Hi, I am curious why don't we use char...since int is 2 bytes(short integer, generally) but char is 1 byte, which can save more spaces?
0
 
LVL 2

Assisted Solution

by:avsrivastava
avsrivastava earned 200 total points
Comment Utility
if memory is an issue, char should be used. if it is a big issue and a lot of bools are needed, use each bit of an int as a bitmap.
if there are only a few bool on modern systems with memory running into GBs, it will not even me measurable, so does not matter at all.

however, i think the idea of using int where bool could be because:
-IMHO int as greater readability than char when used as bool (char 0 is non printable, while int 0 is)
-int used to be the default(implicit) datatype for lot of cases in C(not sure about this though)
0
 
LVL 45

Assisted Solution

by:sunnycoder
sunnycoder earned 300 total points
Comment Utility
Typically chars indeed are used for bool. 1 (non zero or !0) being true and 0 being false. chars are internally stored as ints. To print 0 and 1, use %d flag instead of %c - this would print the ASCII value of the char.
0
 
LVL 9

Author Comment

by:william007
Comment Utility
Thanks=)
0

Featured Post

Backup Your Microsoft Windows Server®

Backup all your Microsoft Windows Server – on-premises, in remote locations, in private and hybrid clouds. Your entire Windows Server will be backed up in one easy step with patented, block-level disk imaging. We achieve RTOs (recovery time objectives) as low as 15 seconds.

Join & Write a Comment

Suggested Solutions

In our personal lives, we have well-designed consumer apps to delight us and make even the most complex transactions simple. Many enterprise applications, however, are a bit behind the times. For an enterprise app to be successful in today's tech wo…
In this article, you will read about the trends across the human resources departments for the upcoming year. Some of them include improving employee experience, adopting new technologies, using HR software to its full extent, and integrating artifi…
This video demonstrates basic masking and how to edit the mask to reveal the desired image.
The viewer will learn how to create multiple layers to apply various filters and how to delete areas from each layer’s filter.

744 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

9 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now