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Responsiveness of My.Computer.Clock.TickCount, and ways to test speed

Posted on 2006-10-22
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Last Modified: 2010-04-23

Hey, I'm trying to speed tweak my code, and I've put a bunch of Debug.Print(My.Computer.Clock.TickCount)'s (to get a sense for which parts are slowest) in a particularly time consuminng procedure and here's a weird thing -- it seems like the My.Computer.Clock.TickCount calls themselves are slowing down the procedure -- anyone else seen that?

Aside from that, anybody have a better or slick way of trying to zero in on the time consuming parts of your code?
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Question by:riceman0
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by:AlexFM
AlexFM earned 250 total points
ID: 17786863
The main problem of TickCount is low precision - about 20 ms. Of course, Debug.Print + time counting change execution time, but there is nothing to do with this.
For high precision time counting use StopWatch class.
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Sancler earned 250 total points
ID: 17792618
Although I agree with AlexFM about the lack of precision using Ticks, my attitude is that any case in which that degree of precision matters is not likely to be the real problem.  Users are unlikely to be bothered by nanosecond differences.

In investigating which is the slowest part of any code what matters is the relative result, not the absolute.  Yes, the actual process of timing different elements of code may affect how long that code takes to execute but, so far as I know, it does so to the same extent whatever the underlying code is.  

So I start with Tick prints at a number of points.  If those highlight major (particularly unexpected) differences in particular areas, I refine them within those areas.  If I get down to a level at which that approach does not produce meaningful results in terms of precision I then program specific test routines, looping the code in those areas a sufficient number of times to make the relative results meaningful.

But my watchword is always "does it matter?".  Nanosecond differences do matter if they are repeated enough times.  Hence the looping tests if it gets down to that level.  Otherwise ...

Roger
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by:Sancler
ID: 17878215
After sales service ;-)

>>
Yes, the actual process of timing different elements of code may affect how long that code takes to execute but, so far as I know, it does so to the same extent whatever the underlying code is.
<<

Or perhaps not, at least with StopWatch.  See here

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Programming/Programming_Languages/Dot_Net/VB_DOT_NET/Q_22047746.html

Roger
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