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Pentium 4HT 3.2Ghz vs Intel Core 2 Duo 2.4Ghz

Posted on 2006-10-23
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How much faster should the Core 2 Due be ? Assuming the same hard disk, same 1GB of memory, using Windows XP ...

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Question by:fischermx
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by:megs28
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You don't mention the CPU cache and what the PC will be used for.  A run-of-the-mill internet surfing, emailing, word processing user won't know the difference.  You can look up and compare the benchmark tests, but this can be rather misleading depending on the application of the machine....ie. gaming, compiling code, a personal "media centre", etc.
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by:fischermx
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The computer will use:

- Visual Studio 2005 for developing Asp.Net Applications
- IIS web server for testing the web applications.
- Photoshop CS2 for design.
- Firefox and Internet Explorer always on background for testing results.
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by:willcomp
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Speed increase is application dependent.  Plug in processors of choice and select benchmarks in link below to give you a good idea of speed differential.  The Core 2 Duo should be appreciably faster in most, if not all, benchmarks.

http://www23.tomshardware.com/cpu.html?modelx=33&model1=432&model2=437&chart=183
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garycase earned 300 total points
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The 3.2GHz Pentium-IV isn't even listed on the benchmarks done in this article (http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/showdoc.aspx?i=2795), but the dual core 3.2GHz P-IV D 940 is.   Considering that the D940 should be appreciably faster than a single core same-clock speed P-IV, then it's safe to assume the Core 2 E6600 (2.4GHz) will very significantly outperform a 3.2GHz single-core CPU.

Comparing the E6600 with the DUAL CORE 3.2GHz P-IV:

SYSMark:   322  vs  221  [NO component score was even close -> the E6600 was far ahead on EVERY score]

WorldBench:  140  vs  102

WinStone:  31.6  vs  22.2

3dsMax7 3D Rendering:  3.39  vs  2.27

etc. ...   In short, the Core 2 blows away the Pentium-D 940 Dual Core 3.2GHz CPU.  (at least 50% improvement)

Hard to say with any precision;  but it's reasonable to say an E6600 would be at least twice as fast as a single core P-IV 3.2GHz.

... but as noted above, whether or not this capability is something you'll notice depends very much on what your application is =>  your compiling and CS2 applications should notice a VERY nice improvement;  the browsers probably less so.






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by:Callandor
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I can tell you from experience what some of the differences are: I have an E6600 Core2 Duo (2.4GHz) that I use in my video server running WinXP Home.  It recompresses captured video in roughly one third the time that my Athlon64 3000+ used to, and that's per core; in other words, it can compress two files in a third of the time my Athlon64 used to take on one file.  Note that P4 HT cpus are better at video compression than Athlon64's, though not by a large margin.

As a synthetic benchmark, it runs SuperPiMod for 1 million digits in 22 seconds, while my overclocked Opteron 148 running at 2.75GHz takes 32 seconds.  The E6600 is running at stock speed on a cheap Asrock VSTA motherboard with PC3200 RAM, and I have read that it can overclock 50% without much difficulty.  The current board is not conducive to overclocking, though.
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by:Deivis007
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Don't forget The P4 HT uses older technology (it has one core, but optimized for calculating different threads) and the new Core2 has 2 indepepndent cores sharing the same cache (which is used much more effectively by choosing which core needs how much, etc.), so it is even a wiser solution than my 2 physical P3-866 (let's forget the clockspeed in this comparison :)
Anyway, you should stick to Core2, unless you gonna save a lot of money on P4 HT (a discount or sth, and this matters to you...) Cheers !

P.S. The Core2 doesn't need a higher clockspeed to perform its older predecessor ;)
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by:fischermx
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I almost can't wait to buy it !! :)

"Sadly", it will have to be a Dell. I wish I could build it myself, but there are no such processor here, most retails just sell the "old" Dual Core, not to say the mobo.
Oops, and I guess it needs an special power suply.
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by:Callandor
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Well, I'm running mine on a Thermaltake 420W without a problem.
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by:garycase
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Nothing special about the power requirements of a Core 2 ... or did you mean the Dell??  (which does use proprietary power supplies on some systems; although I think they've pretty much abandoned that practice)
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by:Deivis007
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I'm sure you'll be glad with your new Core 2 Duo. Well, Dell is a prestigiuos manufacturer, you shouldn't worry about it. Of course, another small OEM manufacturer would we cheaper...
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by:fischermx
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Like who ?
I've not made the purchase yet. They aren't offering the exact configuration I want, here in Mexico.
But I found a good one in a Gateway ad, have not decided anyway.
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by:garycase
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Gateway is making some very nice desktops these days --> ALL of them use Core 2 Duo's (unlike Dell, which is offering lower cost systems that use AMD's and Pentiums).   If you see one at a nice price, go for it :-)
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by:fischermx
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I'm just about with the credit card ready to order in Dell, I always, wanted the 9200 model (http://lastore.dell.com/store/frameset.asp?c=mx&entity_key=DIM9200_REC_CAT&entity_type=CFGSET&l=es&s=dhs&shopper_country=mx&shopper_language=es&shopper_segment=dhs&store_key=LATRANS),
but now I see there's a new one E520. Then I thought to order this newest, however, eventhough is newer, it does not offer the 2.4Ghz, just up to the 2.13Ghz.
http://lastore.dell.com/store/frameset.asp?c=mx&entity_key=DIME520_REC_LACLCOMXPR&entity_type=CFGSET&l=es&s=dhs&shopper_country=mx&shopper_language=es&shopper_segment=dhs&store_key=LATRANS

I don't get it, the newest model offer less power :(
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by:Callandor
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The Dimension line is not the same as the E series; there are new models in different lines.  If you want the most powerful desktop, go for the XPS line or the Workstation line.
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by:fischermx
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What I don't understand for the XPS is what I'm paying for.

In the configurations page I'm seeing an XPS 700 system starts in $21,600 MXN with the E6300, while the 9200 with that same processor costs $16,000 MXN. Same RAM, same other components, even the 9200 has a bigger hard disk than the XPS 700. So, it is like USD$500.00 less for the same CPU/RAM.
So, why the price? Just for a cool chassis ?

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by:Deivis007
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Well, Dell XPS is not "just" a case ( a piece of metal ) - The system is aimed for higher end customers - more system/components testing, etc. Probably better warranties, customer support, and so on... You should ask Dell, and they will give you a nice "lecture" :)
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by:fischermx
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I've just received my Dell 9200, today !
Is it real alloy on the case sides or what  !? :)

Looks beautiful !

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by:garycase
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fischermx ==> Time to stop "playing" with your new toy and close this question :-)  :-)

... but first, tell us just how fast it is !!  [Did you run a SysMark on your old system and then on your new system ??]
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by:fischermx
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BTW, it is real metal on the sides, tested it with a magnet. I have an XPS at work and it is full plastic.

Where can I download that "sysmark" test !?

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by:garycase
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SysMark is not free ... but you can download either of these to get a good overview of the relative performance of your two systems (3dmark is more comprehensive ... but is a rather large download):

http://www.futuremark.com/download/3dmark06/

http://www.futuremark.com/download/pcmark05/
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by:willcomp
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Comment for Gary:

Had the opportunity about 2 weeks ago to build an E6700 system for a business client.  Impressive to say the least.  Used an Intel P965LTCK mobo, 2GB DDR2-667, 250GB Seagate SATA drive, 512MB Radeon X1600 Pro.  I didn't take time to benchmark, but wish I had.  It was quite noticably the fastest PC I've had my hands on and that includes several dual core Athlon 64s.
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by:garycase
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Dalton ... ready for a QX6700 system??  :-)     [Not me ... I'm quite happy with the E6600 level of performance.   I just upgraded my wife's PC (old DDR memory, AGP video, and E6600 using an Asrock Dual-VSTA board) --> and still plan to use an E6600 when I build myself a newer system next month (unless I "steal" my wife's and just give her mine !!) ]

... I may, however, violate one of my cardinal rules for "my" systems and use non-ECC memory.   The P965LTCK looks like a fine motherboard for less than 1/2 of the 975XBX I was planning to use ... the only negative (from my perspective) is it doesn't support ECC memory.
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by:willcomp
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Bad Axe would have been overkill for system.  It's primarily for 2D mapping software.

Don't believe I'll need quad core any time soon either -- but am salivating over E6600s.  Just a matter of time ;-)

How was the Asrock board?  Was very pleased with Intel board.  Got it from Newegg and it was strictly OEM.  Brown box, no manual.  Did have back plate, cables, connection diagram and drivers on CD.  Would not recommend for a novice builder.  Had everthing necessary for us old hands, and I use that term both figuratively and literally :-) :-)
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by:garycase
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I'm not a fan of lower-end boards, but Asrock did a nice job of making a board that lets you use old components with a new Core 2.  My wife's system was acting up ... so I used that as an excuse to try out the Asrock board I've suggested to several folks here.  [IMHO it simply needed a new power supply ... but I took the opportunity to replace the power supply, motherboard, and CPU ... as Callandor accused me in another thread, I (perhaps) "snuck in" a Core 2 :-) ]    It's not a bad board ... all is working well and my wife now has the fastest machine in the house (by quite a bit) ==> although that situation will, of course, be temporary :-)  :-)    [I should have simply used an E6300 for her system, but couldn't bring myself to buy anything less than an E6600]   It was the first Asrock board I've used ... and although it's a nice board, I probably won't use anymore (I still like Intel boards/Intel chipsets) unless I need to upgrade another system with older parts (memory & video card).

... by the way, while the QX6700 is certainly nice; one of the real attractions of the Core 2 Duo's is the amazing performance at very low thermal design power (~65w for an E6600).   The QX6700 has a TDP of 130w => so cooling could be an issue; particularly if (like me) you're a "quiet system freak".   That, plus the simple fact that an E6600 is a phenomenal powerhouse for the $$, is the reason I'll be using an E6600 for my next system.

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by:willcomp
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I've used several Socket A uATX Asrock boards as replacements in eMachine and Compaq (I believe) PCs.  No complaints.  They all worked without any problems.  Nearly a perfect replacement in eMachine PCs.

Socket A boards are getting fewer and fewer.  Asrock is the most readily available and inexpensive. Newegg and ZipZoomFly both carry it.

I'll probably take the plunge back into Intel territory when I'm ready to install a "production" copy of Vista.  Expect that will be February or March.  Still no support from Nero and Roxio that I'm aware of.  RC1 is fairly stable and drivers have not been a problem, but this PC only has a laser printer and USB wireless adapter for peripherals.
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by:Callandor
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Another interesting thing about the Asrock board beside the backward compatible parts feature is that the PCI-e slot works simultaneously with the AGP slot.  I have an XFX 6600GT AGP video card in the AGP slot with an Areca 1220 SATA RAID card in the PCI-e slot.  It is one of the most value-laden boards I've gotten for such a cheap price ($60).
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by:garycase
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... I agree it's an amazing little board.   I just might have to venture into "low cost" territory more :-)

... now if Intel would just drop the cost of an X6800 to about $500 or so :-)
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