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When and how is  .ssh/  directory created?

Posted on 2006-10-23
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06

Hello all,

I know that .ssh/ will be created when a user does ssh first time to a server but this doesn't happen under fedora?
What is the deal with .ssh/  under root  directory?

Should I create it manually or there is a way to make it up? ONCE agin this is about Fedora.

Thanks.
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Question by:akohan
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Expert Comment

by:Tintin
ID: 17792951
Are you absolutely sure it doesn't get created for root?  It does for me.

Are you sure you're looking in

/root/.ssh

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Author Comment

by:akohan
ID: 17793037

Yes! I was expecting it to be created as you did but no. Yes, ran  ls  -la

it is not there.
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Expert Comment

by:Tintin
ID: 17793080
So as root, when you ssh each time to the same server it should give you the usual ssh message about the server not being known, presenting the fingerprint and asking you to confirm whether to procede.  Is that correct?
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Author Comment

by:akohan
ID: 17793689

No. it seems there is a misunderstanding.

Ok. Let's say we have two machines. Machine A and B;  A is your local server and B is a new freshly installed machine.
1) I run  "ssh-keygen -t rsa "  command under /root/.ssh
2) it creates a rsa_key.pub file
3) id_rsa.pub is generated under /root/.ssh/
3) since I need to make a trusted hosts connection I will scp the file in step 3 onto machine B :
   # scp /root/.ssh/id_rsa.pub   root@IP_OF_Machine_B:/root/.ssh

Problem: .ssh/ doesn't exist under /root

How can I create it on Machine B? except manual method? there must be a solid and systematic way to have B create it.

Any comment?

Thanks

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Accepted Solution

by:
ravenpl earned 50 total points
ID: 17793875
> How can I create it on Machine B? except manual method? there must be a solid and systematic way to have B create it.
No, there's not. Some distributions put this directory into user's skeleton - but not all (/etc/skel)
ssh - while using will creast this dir for saving known_hosts (same applies to ssh-keygen)
Otherwise, create by hand, but follows rules
mkdir $HOME/.ssh && chmod 0700 $HOME/.ssh
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Assisted Solution

by:Tintin
Tintin earned 50 total points
ID: 17794200
Step 3 is the easiest most systematic way of doing it.
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Author Comment

by:akohan
ID: 17799217


I found that this could happen on some distriubtion that OS makes the .ssh/ directory but mostly root has to make it.

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