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Installing Redhat 4 without basic X Windows

Posted on 2006-10-24
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
We have gone through and tried installing Redhat 4 with a bare install, no packages or GUI options selected. After the install on boot, loading up the OS, it goes to a very basic X Windows type system. Any idea why this might be happening?


Thanks.
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Question by:newgentechnologies
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by:ravenpl
ID: 17801435
Many applications, even if they don't use X directly need some X libraries (ie they changing xterm titlebar).
Therefore some part of X system is always installed. You may try uninstall it by hand after the system is installed.
Also, if Your system run in X mode at startup, then You have checked something from X envinronment during install. You can revery it back by editing /etc/inittab file. Find line like
id:5:initdefault:
change to
id:3:initdefault:
and reboot (or issue: telinit q)
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ygoutham earned 250 total points
ID: 17801455
if you want the system to boot with a non-GUI option, then change the file

/etc/inittab

change the default boot option to 3 in line

id:5:initdefault

to read something like

id:3:initdefault

this will make the system boot in a command line mode or a non-gui mode.

make sure that the xdm is running on level 5 in the line
x:5:respawn:/etc/X11/prefdm

which means that the GUI is running level 5 but you want the system to boot in default level 3 which is non GUI for you.

probably you tried to install a base level, and chose some package that had a X dependency which got automatically resolved at installation time and redhat installation by default makes the system boot in GUI mode (if you had clicked next on most of the options in install time)

goutham
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by:kyle_in_taiwan
ID: 17802581
Or:

-- you could just go into /etc/rc.d folders for your default runlevel (runlevel 3, i think, so that'd be rc3.d, but you could do ~2 and ~4 just to be safe) and change all entries starting with "S--X11" or "S91xserver" or whatever you've got and change the "S" to a "K"

-- just try and un-install your xserver hardware, and see if you get any dependency conflicts.  If you don't, then fine -- take it off.  If you do, then investigate whether or not you really need to have that functionality present.

-- Similar to the above, you could simply disable all kdm, xdm, and gdm entries by changing them, instead, to a "K".  Your xserver won't initialize, then.

Queries about your hardware will take the form:

$ yum list all [your-favorite-regexpression-here]

So you could do something like this:

$ yum list all *xorg*

and

$ yum list all *x11*  // <=== this one you might want to try changin the x to uppercase, as well

to see what sort of Xserver software you've got installed.  Then, after examining what you've got, you can just go through it all and take off what you don't need.

Still, it sounds like what's happened is y'all unwittingly chose some sort of package that requires and X *environment* to work, and so Fedora's gone and isntalled the entire xserver package because there's no other way to resolve the dependencies that package triggered.  So my guess is that you are going to need to review your installation and track down the packages that called up the xserver installation to see if you really need them (and it).
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