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Switching from ADO > ADO.NET

Hello,

I have a few programs that are written in VB.NET with ADO.  I want to switch this to ADO.NET.  The code is fairly well OO.  I have a ton of data sets, will i need to re-create the data sets?  If there are any big fall backs or hudles in doing this let me know.

thanks!

-Navicerts
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Navicerts
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Navicerts
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2 Solutions
 
ptakjaCommented:
Should be pretty straight forward. You should see a BIG performance boost!
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NavicertsAuthor Commented:
I work with small local record sets in a disconnected environment; things run fairly instantaneously as it is.  Is there still reason to upgrade it?
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ptakjaCommented:
For one, ADO.NET is managed code. This means that it will be more efficient than running through COM Interop which adds an extra layer for all your calls into ADO. Further, upgrades to future versions of Visual Studio may not support ADO as we get further and further away from VB 6.

You are "currently" working with small recordsets in a disconnected environment. But what happens when you transition to a larger enterprise-scale project? That's where knowing ADO.NET will really pay off. My suggestion is to bite the bullet on a small managable project where you can really take the time to learn how this stuff works.

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grayeCommented:
The most troublesome part of the transition from ADO to ADO.Net is grasping the philosophy of a "disconnected recordset".   In ADO.Net everything is inheritantly "disconnected".

A "disconnected" database model is one where your application makes a connection to the database long enough to take a snapshot of the data and then disconnects... you then add/delete/modify the data that is cached locally on your PC... and when you're ready, you reconnect to the database and merge your locally cached changes back to the original database.

I've got programs where the disconnected model doesn't work well (a data "pump" applications that reads a row from one database and writes it to another database).   In those situations, Microsoft recommends that you keep using the "classic" ADO, rather than ADO.Net

... your mileage will vary...
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NavicertsAuthor Commented:
Interesting stuff.  Sounds like i might be able to take advantage of some of this stuff.  I'm going to take your advice and use ADO.net in the next project i do.  If for no other reason than someday ADO will not be supported :)

Thanks for the tips and advice guys!

-Navicerts
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