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Keylog & privacy (shady)

Posted on 2006-10-25
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Last Modified: 2013-11-16
I have reasons to believe that my PC at home has some sort of spying software on it. I’m referring to keylog software’s that lets you track a PC usage.

How do I run a scan on my system to see if it has such software’s on it? Or maybe other types I’m not aware of? Please recommend software I can use to see if my system security has been compromised in anyway. Also please advice if having a "hardware" firewall would be ideal, and what brand it should be.

Thank you.
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Question by:K K
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by:Joe
ID: 17803161
Hi cadnologist,

You can run some scans with these programs below.

Windows Defender
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=435bfce7-da2b-4a6a-afa4-f7f14e605a0d&displaylang=en

Ad-Aware SE Personal

http://www.lavasoftusa.com/products/ad-aware_se_personal.php

Spybot

http://www.safer-networking.org/en/index.html

AVG Anti-Spyware 7.5


http://www.ewido.net/en/

Having a hardware firewall would sure help alot. Do you have a router right now? Or is your connection coming right into your machine?

Joe
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by:Rich Rumble
ID: 17803176
Rootkit revealer and or McAfee can sometimes tell you. A software firewall is actually better in this situation, like ZoneAlarm, as it can keep programs from registering as a service or accessing the NIC, and you can select a password to lock ZA so it can't be shutdown. If you do find something, I'd suggest reformatting and installing from scratch if possible. Make back up's first of your doc's pic's etc... naturally
http://www.sysinternals.com/Utilities/RootkitRevealer.html

A hardware keylogger is easier to spot, but is undetectable from the PC or software that runs on the PC.
-rich
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by:Naser Gabaj
ID: 17803189
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by:jako
ID: 17803410
software keyloggers are covered by previous posts, now try hitting the default special key-combos of most popular hardware keyloggers. That should reveal the piece even if it is well hidden from the sight.

_the best_ configurability/price ratio on a hardware firewall can be a NATing linux box made out of salvaged PC with one extra network card. Slap an IPCop distro (http://ipcop.sf.net) or smth similar on it and you've got highly configurable firewall in your hands.

stay secure..
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by:K K
ID: 17804155
Why all the replies about spyware software’s?! Where did you see in my post a request for anti-spyware software’s!

I specifically noted “KEYLOG” as in someone trying to steal my banking information by KEYLOGS made from my keyboard.

jakopritt, i have no idea what you talking about.

I already have Windows defender runing which out performs zonealarm & adware together, but even then Windows Defender does not look for KEYLOG softwares.

Please ONLY reply if you know of a solution to locate the software logging keyboard keys used.
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by:Joe
ID: 17804624
Below is just a brief overview of just one of various mentioned software above. Most of theses spyware programs will detect most keyloggers.

AVG Anti-Spyware 7.5
The efficient solution against the new generation of threats spreading over the internet. Secure your data and protect your privacy against sypware, adware, trojans, dialer, >>>>keylogger<<<< and worms. We offer you advanced scanning and detection methods and state-of-the-art technology behind an easy to use interface.

Joe
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by:Joe
ID: 17804708
I am also guessing you think somebody is tracking this over the net and not at home? If you install a software firewall this will track all outbound connections for you. There are some Keyloggers people can install on your machine at home ie. a family member or friend etc that are very hard for any program to detect that can run in stealth.
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by:Rich Rumble
ID: 17804774
McAfee knows about lot's of malicious software, rootkitrevealer can tell if a process is hiding from the kernel in order to avoid detection, like lot's of keyloggers do.
http://www.programurl.com/software-anti-keylogger-elite-downloadnow.html is touted to be very good...
-rich
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jako earned 50 total points
ID: 17818304
cadnologist, english is not your first language, is it?
I see that I have to explain myself even if the first post was fairly straightforward IMHO. Alright.

The keylogger you panic about is essentially a form of spyware. Instead of logging data from certain locations (related to browsers) in computer memory it logs it from another area of the computer memory (keyboard buffer, namely). Do you agree with me so far? Well, in order to catch a program doing that there have been programs written that analyze the behaviour of a program (and should therefore catch a keylogger even if it is one of the unencountered kind). If that behaviour matches certain criteria, the program performing those operations is flagged interesting and its name is presented to user for him to make a decision on the following action. What do you do when the supposedly keylogging program is presented to you by Anti-Spyware program is up to you.

Then there are hardware keyloggers that can be hidden away in the keyboards, extension cords or even computer chassis. The type usually requires the keylogger installer to physically come to the keylogging console every once in a while and perform a key combination to dump the keylogger memory and send the dumped data using any means available to an offsite location or secure the data on the location hidden from a user falling victim to a keylogging feat. Agreed? Usually the hardware keyloggers have no interchangeable key combinations that user (a spy) can personalyze and even if they have, the users (spies) won't bother changing those (a security fault right there). So you can easily detect a hardware keylogger hitting the default key combination yourself and take furtehr action on that. Agreed? Did I make my point come across now?

Now the second part of my first post was in response to your question : "Also please advice if having a "hardware" firewall would be ideal, and what brand it should be." Essentially it says that GNU/Linux is a good enough platform for most tasks and there are several Firewall specific distributions out there that are more suited for firewalling tasks than others. Given a little time and perseverance you can build a firewall out of an old PC yourself using exactly those specific distributions. There. This answer is probably going straight to a hall of fame..  I stop my rambling right here. Now :D
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by:K K
ID: 17844351
jakopriit, that was the best rambling answer i have ever read on EE!


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by:jako
ID: 17855190
I don't feel I've earned the points. Not all of them. Can we, please, split them?
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