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Port Forwarding

Posted on 2006-10-25
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I have a NAT router and windows server 2003 box with DNS after the router.  The server handles all websites and DNS with port 80 forwarded to it.  Is it possible to add a second server with other websites and put another forward lookup zone on the first server to redirect web requests to the second new server?
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Question by:firemanrob
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by:mikeleebrla
ID: 17808419
wow,,,i'm not really sure where to start with this one. You are throwing a bunch of terms out there and i'm not sure you understand them (no offence).

1.  how many PUBLIC IPs do you have?
2.  what kind of NAT router do you have?
>>The server handles all websites and DNS with port 80 forwarded to it.

if it hosts your public DNS, it will have to have port 53 forwarded to it as well, but what do you mean by it handles 'all' websites? do you mean that server is the DNS server server that all your clients are pointed to? Do you mean that this server hosts ALL websites that you host? or what?


>>Is it possible to add a second server with other websites and put another forward lookup zone on the first server to redirect web requests to the second new server?

this is the statement that has me really confused....forward DNS lookup zones do NOT redirect web requests.  Forward lookup zones respond to DNS queries: thats it, nothing more.  IE a request for www.yourdomain.com will return to the client the IP (in the forward lookup zone) for www.youdomain.com IE 88.3.2.1.  Then the DNS client will look to 88.3.2.1 to find www.yourdomain.com, thats it.  A forward lookup zone cannot redirect, but it does DIRECT.

If you want some of the websites that you host to be DIRECTED to another server, just edit the PUBLIC DNS record for those websites to point to the PUBLIC IP of another web server.

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by:mahe2000
ID: 17809082
i'm not sure if something can do what you want. however i think that a third server (or one of the existing ones) with a reverse proxy can help you to solve the problem
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Author Comment

by:firemanrob
ID: 17809215
Mike,

No offense taken.  I have one public IP supplies by a cable internet provider.  From the cable modem I have a D-link 4-port router with port 80 forwarded to my server1.  Server1 hosts my websites as well as internal DNS.  I guess what I'm looking to do is have all website A-records go to that one public IP.  It would then get forwarded to my server1 which currently hosts internal DNS and all of my websites.  Id like to create a new forward lookup zone on the internal dns to redirect a website request to another server.  

Example:

 www.mysite1.com:80---->MyPublicIP--->Router-->192.168.0.104(Server1)---->InternalDNS---->IISServer1

But what I'd like to do:

www.mysite2.com:80---->MyPublicIP--->Router-->192.168.0.104(Server1)---->InternalDNS---->IISServer2

Does that make sense?
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Steve Knight earned 1000 total points
ID: 17809394
That's not how it works.  As has suggested above you either need a reverse proxy in the middle, e.g. ISA server can redirect to different servers based on URL or most easily a second public IP address which your router then forwards to server2.  The public dns for that server would then point to the new ip.

Your internal dns does not come into this at all really apart from your own internal access to these sites (as you probably can't get to the external side of your router from inside the network you probably haved touse the internal address.

Another way would be to use different ports, e.g. port 81 on your public IP and forward it through router to server2.  This is messy though as the url is then www.yoursite.com:81 and this may not be accessible to people on networks behind firewalls and proxy servers (i.e. most people, especially corporates)

Steve
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Author Comment

by:firemanrob
ID: 17809478
ok makes sense.  I am only familiar with home network routers that support one WAN IP.  Where can I check out routers that can obtain multiple WAN IP's like this would need?
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Expert Comment

by:Steve Knight
ID: 17809554
Sorry my knowledge of cable connections is nil as I have always had ADSL and cable doesn't get used by businesses normally in th uk.  Does the modem present a standard ethernet cable connection for starters?

If so pretty well any small dual ethernet interface Cisco router would do the trick.  What do you have at the moment?
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Assisted Solution

by:mahe2000
mahe2000 earned 1000 total points
ID: 17811331
To handle multiples IPs you can use a small firewall like cisco pix 501 at not a high coast and that will help you with improving your security too.
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