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Posted on 2006-10-26
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I have a small office network with xp computers and 2000 computers. One server running Windows 2003 Server.

On one of my computers when I log on I get a command window that says

cmd.exe was started with the above path as the current directory.
UNC paths are not supported. Defaulting to Windows Directory.

Then it asks me to enter the username and password.

I am thinking I could just map this drive, but frankly I don't know what Netlogon is.

In my startup folder there is a shortcut to logon also.
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Question by:mrmyth
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by:Gareth Gudger
ID: 17816152
What exactly is the problem? Netlogon is a system file Windows 2000 and Windows XP that allows you to log on to a domain. Is that what you have set up here? I assume so with the Windows 2003 Server. It sounds like logon in your startup menu is a logon.bat. A batch file to map logins. You can probably delete logon and it shouldn't prompt you with the cmd.exe o rthe login password error. But then was that your question?
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by:Gareth Gudger
ID: 17816157
"A batch file to map logins."

Supposed to read "A batch file to maps network drives."
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Author Comment

by:mrmyth
ID: 17816859
Yes, I am on a domain with computers logging into the domain.

So cmd.exe is a file that maps network drives? Is it supposed to be in the folder of programs that startup when windows starts up?

Is that what it does is map network drives. Somehow I didn't think it worked that way.

So let's say that I map some network drives and I check the box that says to reconnect at login. Does it then put a cmd.exe shortcut in my startup folder?

I don't think it does. I think someother program must have put that there. Am I right?
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Expert Comment

by:mcsween
ID: 17821105
In your AD profile a logon script has been specified.  This is what you are seeing in the command window (cmd.exe opens a command prompt)

This logon script is located at
\\domainname\netlogon\scriptname.bat

When it kicks off cmd does not allow you to access UNC paths (\\server\share) so it defaults to the windows directory or  your home directory which has a drive letter (hard map)

The username/password prompt you are getting is because this logon script is trying to map a drive to a network share you do not have access to.  It sees that you are not allowed to access this so it's asking for credentials to an account that does have access.
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mcsween earned 2000 total points
ID: 17821156
FYI - there is probably nothing in your startup folder that has to do with this.  The netlogon service running on your PC gets a command from the netlogon service that is running on the domain controller telling your comptuer to run the script that's located in the \\domainname\netlogon\ folder.

If you click start, run and type \\%userdomain%\netlogon then press enter the folder will open that has the logon scripts in them.

If you open AD Users and Computers and look under your user object on the profile tab you will see the name of the logon script.

You can RC, edit the script and see what shares it's mapping you to and check the security on those shares to ensure you really do have access.  If you do have access there may be an AD issue or DNS issue causing the authentication to fail.
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by:mrmyth
ID: 17825947
Thank you for that thorough answer.
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