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Setting up a 2003 Terminal Server.

Hello all,

I have read up on setting up a terminal server and feel I have a good grasp. I currently use the 2 RDP all the time and need to increase the amount of users accessing. My questions are in regards to setting up on the only server we have.

What kind of performance drain will 3 users accessing one program cause on our office server that has 10 LAN users daily?


We have dual xeon 3.4GHz with 2GB's of ram.

Can I setup the Terminal Server on the only 2003 server we have and later move it to a dedicated server or do I need to push the bosses for a second server?

What do I need for a second server (hardware recommendations)? Is it just a 2003 server with add /remove programs addition of Terminal server?
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mburke3434
Asked:
mburke3434
1 Solution
 
SamuraiCrowCommented:
I don't think you are going to see a large resource loss with only three users hitting the machine (given the machine specs you have provided).  Adding another Terminal Server down the road shouldn't be an issue.  Just make sure that you don't need to move the licensing server for terminal services.  Generally you should install the licensing component on a domain controller or another machine that isn't going to change often.  

There are actually quite a few consierations that need to be looked at to properly size a terminal server.  For general office use you could easily get away with a Dual Xeon 3.4 and greater with 2GB of RAM for an office of 10 or less.  Just in case take a look at the MS Terminal Server Sizing page:
http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/library/cb201937-8f68-4d0f-9521-99e090ddd6b11033.mspx?mfr=true

One last note.  If this TS is delivering mission critical applications you might want to push for the second box for load balancing and fault tolerence.

Hope this helps
Crow
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mburke3434Author Commented:
Worked like a charm...thanks again.
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