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FreeBSD 6.1, Apache 2.1.4, and rc.d

Posted on 2006-10-29
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Last Modified: 2013-11-22
Apache runs great but I have to manually start it after a reboot.  I have included "apache_enable="YES" in /etc/rc.conf.  And checked it twice for typos and consider it good.  I looked into /etc/rc.d and do not see anything "Apache" there.  I think this is the problem but wonder where can I get a copy of the 6.1 start up script to test my theory?
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Question by:Shearer-Services
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4 Comments
 
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TeRReF earned 500 total points
ID: 17828560
Change it into:
apache21_enable="YES"
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Expert Comment

by:TeRReF
ID: 17828567
The apache startup script resides in:
/usr/local/etc/rc.d/

There you'll find a .sh script named:
apache21.sh (hence the apache21_enable line in rc.conf)

If the apache script is called differently, use a corresponding line in rc.conf
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Expert Comment

by:vbotka
ID: 17828594
Settings of the user-installed aplications is placed in the /usr/local base. So the the directories to take a look at are /usr/local/etc and /usr/local/etc/rc.d. For apache the configuration files are placed in /usr/local/etc/apache/ and the start-up script is /usr/local/etc/rc.d/apache.sh . The script is placed there by the "make install" but here is the listing anyway:

### start listing here

# cat /usr/local/etc/rc.d/apache.sh
#!/bin/sh
# $FreeBSD: ports/www/apache13-modssl/files/rcng.sh,v 1.5 2006/02/20 20:47:46 dougb Exp $

# PROVIDE: apache
# REQUIRE: DAEMON
# BEFORE: LOGIN
# KEYWORD: shutdown

# Define these apache_* variables in one of these files:
#       /etc/rc.conf
#       /etc/rc.conf.local
#       /etc/rc.conf.d/apache
#
# DO NOT CHANGE THESE DEFAULT VALUES HERE
#
apache_enable="${apache_enable-NO}"
apache_flags="-DSSL"
apache_pidfile="/var/run/httpd.pid"

. /etc/rc.subr

name="apache"
rcvar=`set_rcvar`
command="/usr/local/sbin/httpd"

load_rc_config $name

pidfile="${apache_pidfile}"
start_precmd="`/usr/bin/limits -e -U www`"

run_rc_command "$1"

### stop listing here

Try to start apache with:
#/usr/local/etc/rc.d/apache.sh star

And check if it is running:
# /usr/local/etc/rc.d/apache.sh status
apache is running as pid 646.

You do not have to reboot the box.
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Expert Comment

by:vbotka
ID: 17828598
Errata:
Try to start apache with:
#/usr/local/etc/rc.d/apache.sh start
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