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LIKE operator not matching exact strings?

eric0213
eric0213 asked
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Last Modified: 2009-07-29
Has anybody ever heard of the LIKE operator not matching exact strings? For example I would expect "WHERE lastname LIKE 'Smith%'" to return records like "Smith" and "Smithe". But I'm running into an issue where only "Smithe" is returned, not "Smith". The lastname column is an nvarchar.

One workaround I'm using is "WHERE lastname + ' ' LIKE 'Smith%'". It works, but this is causing a huge performance hit (around 20 times slower). I've tried PATINDEX, instead of LIKE, but it's not very fast either.

I'm looking for any suggestions, articles about this problem, or any confirmation of this problem.

Thanks
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look for a space after the "Smith "
in your data

select fname+'X'
and if it comes back Smith X instead of SmithX

you know that's the problem

or use righttrim to remove spaces
where righttrim(lastname) like 'Smith%'
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Commented:
all of the below work for me:


select 'Smith'
where  'Smith' like 'Smith%'

select 'Smith '
where  'Smith ' like 'Smith%'

select 'Smithe'
where  'Smithe' like 'Smith%'

select 'Smithe '
where  'Smithe ' like 'Smith%'


is there something else in your query that may be excluding the Smith row(s)?
Sorry.. my example for diagnosis should be

select lastname+'X'

and the trim statement should be

where rtrim(lastname) like 'Smith%'


Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]Billing Engineer
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Most Valuable Expert 2014
Top Expert 2009

Commented:
>Has anybody ever heard of the LIKE operator not matching exact strings?
I did not. Looks curious?!
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Top Expert 2011

Commented:
what are you actually doing?

"WHERE lastname LIKE 'Smith%'"

seems to have the wrong number of quotes for dynamic sql....

lastname like 'SMITH%'   will return SMITH AND SMITHE


"WHERE lastname LIKE 'Smith%'"

should be

'WHERE lastname like ''SMITH%'''

that's all single quotes 6 in total





awking00Information Technology Specialist
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Commented:
Perhaps it could be the problem is that the spaces are in front. If so, use lefttrim -
select ...
where lefttrim(lastname) like 'Smith%';

Author

Commented:
I looked at the records and there are no spaces on either side. I added an RTrim and it didn't help.

This seems like such a basic thing, I'm not sure why the records don't get returned. I was hoping someone had seen this before, either in an old version of MSSQL, or when using indexed columns, or when there was a full moon.

I've spent a good chunk of morning searching for someone else with this issue, but nothing. I've searched here, the newsgroups, MSDN, and the web (not exhaustively of course).
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Commented:
what does this do on your system?


select 'Smith'
where  'Smith' like 'Smith%'

select 'Smith '
where  'Smith ' like 'Smith%'

select 'Smithe'
where  'Smithe' like 'Smith%'

select 'Smithe '
where  'Smithe ' like 'Smith%'

Author

Commented:
knightEknight, they all return one record.

awking00, tried, no luck.

Lowfatspread, the double quotes were just there to delimit what I had in my SQL, they weren't really in the statement.

Essentially, I want my LIKE statement to function like below (LIKE is not case-sensitive). The UPPER function below is costing me as much as appending a space.
     WHERE lastname LIKE 'Smith%' OR UPPER(lastname) = 'SMITH'
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Commented:
If each of the above statements returned one record, then the LIKE operator is working normally on your system.  Is there something else in your query that may be filtering out the expected rows?  Can you post your entire query?
I still think there are invisible characters in your data. That has always been the situation when I have had this kind of problem...


select lastname, ascii(substring(lastname,6,1))
from  mytable where substring(lastname,1,5)='Smith'

Also, can you insert the actual value of 'Smith' into your database temporarily and see if the SQL works on newly inserted data?

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In 20 years of SQL writing I have seen many occasions where things just like this occurred... and in every case the problem was either the data or SQL logic on my side.

So do not look for an error in SQL in handling this simple SQL unless you are running a beta version or something (by the way, in your reply post your version just in case .. select @@version and send us the results)
Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]Billing Engineer
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Most Valuable Expert 2014
Top Expert 2009

Commented:
my suggestion:
points to AaronAbend, as to his remark of using the ascii function to identify what characters are really in the string to identify the "culprit" data.
angelIII, page editor
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