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Using switch as a Reapter

Hello Experts,

I need to run a 5e cable over the max length. Does anyone know if I can use a switch as a repeater. Also, if anyone has done this before and has a good product please feel free to recommend.
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americaster
Asked:
americaster
1 Solution
 
jasonr0025Commented:
Yes, you can run a cat5e cable say 90m to a switch and then run another 90m to pc or another switch.  
I would try to limit this as much as possible though.
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ChristophermageeCommented:
The maximum cable length should be 100M. So as long as the cable doesnt exceed 100M you will be fine using a switch. Any switch will do the job so no real product reccomendation.
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jasonr0025Commented:
Yes the maximum cable lenth is 100m but I reccomend 90m as most forget to calculate patch cables and such.  
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ChristophermageeCommented:
To be honest ive never even come close to the maximun cable length, I got a 50 metre cable once but about 20metres of that was unused. :/
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Austin TexasSystems EngineerCommented:
Repeaters are just little concentrators, a.k.a. hubs.  You can use a cheap little hub or switch for this.

Max length per run is 100 meters or about 318 feet.  (only about 30 floors of a building)

Be wary of using too many repeaters in a row.  Repeaters require a small amount of time to regenerate the signal. This can cause a propagation delay which can affect network communication when there are several repeaters in a row.

With hubs and repeaters you will need to use the 5-4-3 rule (http://www.tencorp.com/SALESTIP.NSF/0/5b465b14bfaee6c985256c52006e36a2?OpenDocument) while with a switch you will not.

Hope that helps.

Thanks - Tex  
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kadadi_vCommented:
Yes you can use the cat-5E cable for max 100meter lenth then why you are not using the cat-6 cable and for repaters or to joint the cable then join the two cables using coupler to exend the length means if you want the uplink from that cable then use the swtich as repeter to connect more pc on the networkand if you used the max 100meter cable then it trnasfer the data slowly.Make 60meter cable and then extend that cable with coupler to join the anoter cable or use switch to uplink that network.


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jasonr0025Commented:
1meter = 3.28feet not 3.18 so 100m = 328 feet and this includes patch cords.
The original question was it ok to use CAT5e and a SWITCH as a repeater and the answer again is yes.
As far as a brand switch--any will do
thanks
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americasterAuthor Commented:
If I was to use the switch as a repeater then total cable length should not be an issue. As I understand the very purpose of a repeater is to amplify the signal which would allow one to extend the total length of the cable past the maximum 328ft.

To clairify my senario, I would be running a line 200 ft to a switch then running a line another 200ft or so. The total cable length would be over 328ft but each section would be under the max.

Do you think this will work with a switch or should I get an repeater (or extender as patton describes)

Thanks again...
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jasonr0025Commented:
The switch will be fine  
This is done everyday.  Most companies have a switch with atleast 2 pc's that are 150 ft or so from the switch.  
Do what you are stating-throw a small switch in the middle and you will be fine---promise.
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