Inserting signature on Reply's and Forwards

Ok here is the situation:

Outlook 2003 SP2

I have setup my signature and it works fine on new messages.  I don't have it auto inserting on replies and forwards.  I want to be able to use the INSERT --> SIGNATURE function of Outlook to put in the signature on replies, when I want it.

The only problem is, that feature only exists when I turn off, using MS Office as my default editor for composing emails.

I want to use that, so it does the inline spellcheck, but I also need the ability to insert my signature when needed.

I know turning off MS Office for composing emails makes it works, i tried it, but I want to use both.  Is there any way???

thx
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citsloginAsked:
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Serena HsiMarketing ConsultantCommented:
If you use Word as your editor, you can certainly setup as many auto-text entries as you want, or however many custom signatures you want available. I use the backward slash plus text for my auto-text entries, like \sig1, \sig2

AutoText can accomodate graphics and multiple lines of text. It's whatever you select in a Word document and use the Insert / AutoText / New menu command.

==To create a new autotext entry:

Select the text or graphic you want to store as an AutoText entry.

To store paragraph formatting (paragraph formatting: Formatting that controls the appearance of a paragraph. Examples include indentation, alignment, line spacing, and pagination.) with the entry, include the paragraph mark () in the selection.

On the Insert menu, point to AutoText, and then click New.

When Microsoft Word proposes a name for the AutoText entry, accept the name or type a new one.

If you plan to insert the entry by using AutoComplete, make sure the name contains at least four characters because Word inserts an entry only after four characters have been typed.

==To change an autotext entry:

Insert the AutoText entry into the document.

AutoText (AutoText: A storage location for text or graphics you want to use again, such as a standard contract clause or a long distribution list. Each selection of text or graphics is recorded as an AutoText entry and is assigned a unique name.) entries are divided into categories such as Closing or Salutation. Check the Normal category for entries you've created unless you know they are stored under another category.

Click in the document where you want to insert the AutoText entry.

On the Insert menu, point to AutoText, and then point to the type of entry you want to insert.

Click the name of the AutoText entry you want.

You can also use a shortcut to insert an AutoText entry. First, turn on AutoComplete (point to AutoText on the Insert menu, click AutoText, and then select the Show AutoComplete suggestions check box). In your document, type the first few characters in the AutoText entry's name. When Microsoft Word suggests the complete AutoText entry, press ENTER or F3 to accept the entry.
If the AutoText entry contains a graphic without text, press F3 to accept the entry.

To reject the AutoText entry, keep typing.

The entries in the lists on the AutoText menu and the AutoText toolbar (toolbar: A bar with buttons and options that you use to carry out commands. To display a toolbar, press ALT and then SHIFT+F10.) correspond to the language of the text that your insertion point is positioned in. For example, if you are typing French in the English version of Word, the AutoText entries that appear on the menu and on the toolbar list will be in French, but the ones on the AutoText tab in the AutoCorrect dialog box will be in English.

To insert AutoText entries in the language you're typing in, use the AutoText menu (point to AutoText on the Insert menu) or click All Entries on the AutoText toolbar. To insert AutoText entries in the language version of Word that you are using, use the AutoText tab in the AutoCorrect dialog box (point to AutoText on the Insert menu, and then click AutoText).

Also note that if you insert an AutoText field by using the Field Options dialog box (Insert menu, Field command), the Field Options dialog box, like the AutoText tab, reflects the language version of Word that you are using, not the language you are typing in.

Make the changes you want.
Select the revised AutoText entry.
To store paragraph formatting (paragraph formatting: Formatting that controls the appearance of a paragraph. Examples include indentation, alignment, line spacing, and pagination.) with the entry, include the paragraph mark () in the selection.

On the Insert menu, point to AutoText, and then click New.
Type the original name of the AutoText entry.

==To rename an entry:

On the Tools menu, click Templates and Add-Ins.
Click Organizer, and then click the AutoText tab.
In the In box on the left, click the entry you want to rename, and then click Rename.
In the Rename dialog box, type a new name for the entry.
Click OK, and then click Close.
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war1Commented:
Greetings, citslogin !

Manually insert a signature in an individual message. This feature is only available when using Microsoft Outlook as your e-mail editor, and not MS Word as editor

    * Create or open the message.
    * In the message body, click where you want to insert the signature.
    * On the Insert menu, point to Signature , and then click the signature you want.

If the signature you want is not listed, click More , and in the Signature box, select the one you want to use.

You can automatically insert a signature in all new messages, or in all messages you reply to or forward

    * From the main Microsoft Outlook window, on the Tools menu, click Options , and then click the Mail Format tab.
    * In the Compose in this message format list, click the message format that you want to use the signature with.
    * Under Signature , select an e-mail account, and then choose the signatures that you want to use for new messages and for replies and forwards.


Best wishes!
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citsloginAuthor Commented:
Yes I do know this, as I stated in my original post.  Thanks for the follow up, but its not a solution to the question, only a reiteration of what I said.  I am aware there might not be a way to do it, I'm just looking for someone who is creative and figured out a work around or something.  For that, I will award points.
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war1Commented:
citslogin,

Manually insert a signature in an individual message by using Word as your e-mail editor

   1. In the open message, click where you want to insert the signature in the message body.
   2. On the Insert menu, point to AutoText, point to Signature, and then click the signature that you want to use.

Notes:
    * When you use Word as your e-mail editor, the signature that you can insert manually is AutoText that comes from the name and information that you typed when you installed Microsoft Office. To view the information in Word, on the Tools menu, click Options, and then click User Information.
    * When you use Word as your e-mail editor and you have Outlook automatically apply your signature to messages that you send, forward, or reply to, the signature comes from the e-mail signature that you created in one of the following places:
          o In Word, on the Tools menu, click Options, click General, and then click E-mail Options.
          o In Outlook, on the Tools menu, click Options, click Mail Format, and then click Signatures.

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/assistance/HA011752721033.aspx#CreateInsert
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citsloginAuthor Commented:
I don't have a Signature option under auto text.  I only have Signature Company, and that is empty.

Please advise.
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war1Commented:
When you use Word as your e-mail editor, the signature that you can insert manually is AutoText that comes from the name and information that you typed when you installed Microsoft Office. To view the information in Word, on the Tools menu, click Options, and then click User Information.
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war1Commented:
citslogin, any update?
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