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who to create a wireless connection?

Posted on 2006-11-01
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Hi,

I have no idea about wireless so if you have any good links so I can read and learn please add it.

In my office we are doing some changes and I would like to setup a wireless connection for the boardroom and the two interview rooms. All the rooms will have a cable running from the switch to socket so at the moment we are using a cable from the socket to the laptop. which is not a great idea and does not look good especially when we have training and we are using 6 or 8 laptops there are two many cables.

So I need to have a wireless connection one computer/laptop and when we have training is there a wireless hub where the connection will go to the hub and then to all the laptops?

I have a bout 2 months to come with a solution.

Thanks

Avi
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Question by:avi_arditi
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by:jcdesign4u
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by:avi_arditi
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Hi,

thanks for the quick respond. I am going to check it out.

thanks

Avi
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by:srgilani
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Below articles will help you in understanding WIFI as well its deployments.

computer.howstuffworks.com/wireless-network.htm
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WiFi
lcawww.epfl.ch/salem/IP4Web/wifi_deployment.htm

www.microsoft.com/technet/itsolutions/network/wifi/default.mspx

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Nick Denny earned 500 total points
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As you will already have a modem/router/switch etc, you need a wireless access point (WAP) to create a wirless local area network (WLAN).

In one of the network points that come from the switch, you can simply add a WAP, something basic like:
http://www.netgear.com/Products/WirelessAccessPoints/WirelessAccessPoints/WG602.aspx
(Alternatively, you could hide the WAP e.g., in the roof space, outside the room etc)

Each computer that needs to connect wirelessly will need a wireless NIC (network card) either built in or added.
Most modern laptops have built in wireless, if not, a simple USB adapter such as:
http://www.netgear.com/Products/Adapters/GWirelessAdapters/WG111.aspx
will do just fine.

Please note the Netgear examples above are relatively cheap and simple devices. You would need to decide on what level of equipment you require.
There are many such devices available, with varying levels of speed, security, range etc, and therefore price differences.

You can add many computers to each access point (dependant on availability of IP address's).
Provided all 3 rooms that need covering are close together, one WAP will be sufficient.

Tutorial on how to set up:
http://compnetworking.about.com/cs/wirelessproducts/a/howtobuildwlan_3.htm

More tutorials on security here:
http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/tutorials/article.php/2148721
and
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/midsizebusiness/topics/serversecurity/wirelessaccessconfig.mspx
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by:yasirirfan
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by:masnrock
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seriousnick more or less said the same thing that I was going to post. Just get a wireless access point, and be sure to secure it since you're probably not going to want just anyone to easily access your network. Lots of good products out there on the market for you to choose from.
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by:avi_arditi
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Thanks to you all.

I think I am going to have a small experiment with the netgear - thanks seriousnick.

the question that I have for you is: In the network the points that come from the switch, I will do as you said a simple a WAP, the laptops some have the option for wireless and some will have the netgrear wireless nic, my network has a good rang of IP address. So does the laptop can be carried from the user table and then turn on in the boardroom room and it will receive the same IP address (all clients are set to receive ip address automatically)?  Is there a way to prevent users that works just out side the boardroom to receive the connection?

The speed of the connection will be as fast as the slowest link in the line which is from the switch to the point on the boardroom is that correct?

Again thank you for you all

Avi
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by:Nick Denny
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If you are running a domain, as you will know, the DHCP server will allocate an IP address (or your router will).
It is usual for any machine to be re-issued the same IP when it re-connects (athough this is to the network card NOT the computer. i.e. if you switch from wired to wireless it is unlikley that the same IP will be given).
You can however set reservations to ensure this happens if necessary.

The WAP will also need an IP, you can assign a static IP or use DHCP - I suggest a static manually assigned and set this in the scope on the DHCP (if using a domain) or start the range in the router at say .10 - reserving .2 - .9 for static..

With regard to other users - yes they could connect - however utilising a combination of WPA security and/or MAC address filtering, they would not be able to connect.
MAC address filtering would only allow the unique ID of each network device to connect to the WAP. This in itself is usually adeqaute for standard use - however, MAC address spoofing is not uncommon and this type of security is relatively simple for savvy users to compromise.

Finally once all wireless connections have been made and therefore saved in each computer, you could also close down the SSID broadcast - i.e. the WAP would not be able to be seen by other wireless users.

>>"The speed of the connection will be as fast as the slowest link in the line"<< yes - but not always obvious/easy to determine where this is.
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by:avi_arditi
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Thanks seriousnick,

I am ordering the hardware and looking forward to all the problems ahead.
I think this should be ok. In the big boardroom I am going to use 3 WAP points and yes I was thnking that myself that a static IP address for each one is the way to go. As to the NIC yes I will let the DHCP provide on and as it will find a new NIC for the wireless connection it is going to be a new IP Address.
At the moment I am reading about security and how to ensure that staff members working near the boardroom will not be able to connect - one way is to disable their wireless connection - when ever they need it back I will teach them how to activate it, but that is not a secure way.

Again thank you for all about the advice and the time you took to help me.

I will keep you all up to date as I go.


Thanks

Avi
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by:Nick Denny
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Hi Avi

If the boardroom is not a vast football pitch size, one WAP would happily cope with a normal size room. You can connect many NIC's to one WAP.

As regards the others near the boardroom in range, as I mentioned, using a combination of MAC filtering and WPA security will prevent them from connecting.

And, once your "allowed" connections are made, you can prevent the WPA from broadcasting itself (i.e. make it invisible) so no others even know its there.

Those NIC's that have already connected will "remember" the WiFi settings and should automatically connect even when the WAP is in invisible mode.

If you need continually changing connections - e.g. you have many visitors needing connection, you can either manually input the settings each time or temporarily allow broadcasting of the WAP and simply use WPA-PSK security (this will be a "passphrase" of your choosing - the longer the better).

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by:Nick Denny
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Edit

"you can prevent the WPA from broadcasting itself "

should be

"you can prevent the WAP from broadcasting itself "

sorry  :)
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by:avi_arditi
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Thanks for you all for the help.

We can close this question
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by:Nick Denny
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HI Avi
Did you manage to set up the wireless system?

How to close a question:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/help.jsp#hi9
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