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random ethernet device name??

Ok, I've been doing Linux networking for over 10 years now and I've never seen this before.  So I boot up this Compaq pc that I loaded FC5 on, and it has an onboard Compaq 10/100, a PCI Intel 10/100, and a 3Com 905b 10/100 card in it.  Here's the dmesg output:

e100: Intel(R) PRO/100 Network Driver, 3.5.10-k2-NAPI
e100: Copyright(c) 1999-2005 Intel Corporation
ACPI: PCI Interrupt 0000:05:04.0[A] -> GSI 16 (level, low) -> IRQ 177
e100: eth0: e100_probe: addr 0xfc520000, irq 177, MAC addr 00:02:B3:B2:9F:24
ACPI: PCI Interrupt 0000:05:08.0[A] -> GSI 20 (level, low) -> IRQ 185
e100: eth1: e100_probe: addr 0xfc521000, irq 185, MAC addr 00:08:02:3B:8F:58
ACPI: PCI Interrupt 0000:05:09.0[A] -> GSI 18 (level, low) -> IRQ 169
3c59x: Donald Becker and others. www.scyld.com/network/vortex.html
0000:05:09.0: 3Com PCI 3c905B Cyclone 100baseTx at e007e000.

So, I should have eth1, eth2, and eth3 right?  Not!

[root@eipids03 ~]# ifconfig -a
dev1804289383 Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:08:02:3B:8F:58  
          BROADCAST MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
          RX bytes:0 (0.0 b)  TX bytes:0 (0.0 b)

eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:10:5A:1D:F9:FE  
          inet addr:x.x.x.x  Bcast:x.x.x.x Mask:255.255.255.0
          inet6 addr: fe80::210:5aff:xxxx:xxxx/64 Scope:Link
          UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:3214 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:248 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
          RX bytes:210009 (205.0 KiB)  TX bytes:44211 (43.1 KiB)
          Interrupt:169 Base address:0xe000

eth1      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:02:B3:B2:9F:24  
          BROADCAST MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
          RX bytes:0 (0.0 b)  TX bytes:0 (0.0 b)

lo        Link encap:Local Loopback  
          inet addr:127.0.0.1  Mask:255.0.0.0
          inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
          UP LOOPBACK RUNNING  MTU:16436  Metric:1
          RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
          RX bytes:0 (0.0 b)  TX bytes:0 (0.0 b)

sit0      Link encap:IPv6-in-IPv4  
          NOARP  MTU:1480  Metric:1
          RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
          RX bytes:0 (0.0 b)  TX bytes:0 (0.0 b)


And every time the system reboots, dev1804289383 becomes a new name - still prefixed with dev but with some random number after it.  What the heck is going on here??  This interface is the onboard Compaq 10/100, by the way.
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scstanton1337
Asked:
scstanton1337
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2 Solutions
 
pablouruguayCommented:
what happend if you post an alias in modprobe?

alias drivername eth3 ?
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pablouruguayCommented:
sorry

alias eth3 driver_module_name"
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scstanton1337Author Commented:
Well, there already was an alias in /etc/modprobe.conf like this:

alias eth0 3c59x
alias eth1 e100
alias eth2 e100


I changed the order so that 3c59x is eth1, then the first e100 is eth0, and it seems to have fixed the issue.  Very strange!
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jar3817Commented:
The same thing happened to me last year when I stuck a cheapo nic in an existing server. This was a router, so making firewall rules with an interface name that changes after every reboot wasn't a great situtation. I never did figure out how to stop that, I just replaced nic with a dual Intel pro100 card.
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ravenplCommented:
You can bind ethX names to particular device with udev rules. In such case messages from bootlog are irrelevant.
Check out if there are some rules for ethX devices at /etc/udev/rules.d
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scstanton1337Author Commented:
Nope, nothing for eth interfaces in udev rules
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ravenplCommented:
Will this be useful for You. http://www.redhat.com/archives/fedora-list/2006-August/msg03387.html
If You think You know what You doing - You can try editing /etc/sysconfig/hwconf instead of removing...
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scstanton1337Author Commented:
Well, the newly generated hwconf is identical to the old one except for the device names, which still don't match what modprobe.conf specifies.  The running config appears to be based on modprobe.conf, and the dev34135135165316136135 name is not happening anymore.
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