Copy partition then rename to C:

I have one hard drive with just a C: partition.
I have a second hard drive with F: G: H: I: partitions.

I want to use the second hard drive as the main hard drive
and get rid of the one drive with C:

I want to copy the C: drive to the G: partition of the other drive,
and then rename the G: to C:

How can I accomplish this?
Can I do this with the have MaxBlast3 software CD
that came with the second drive?  thanks
LVL 16
MikeMCSDAsked:
Who is Participating?

[Product update] Infrastructure Analysis Tool is now available with Business Accounts.Learn More

x
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

CallandorCommented:
You might be able to do this, but it is not simple: http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;Q223188

Make sure you have a backup, in case it doesn't work.
0
MikeMCSDAuthor Commented:
thanks Call . .
it says on the MaxBlast3 software that I can boot to the that CD, but it
didn't boot to it when I tried it. Do I need to change something in the BIOS first?
I'm thinking I can change the drive letter with that software, but
not sure.
0
CallandorCommented:
The MaxBlast3 software is for cloning hard drives - it can't change drive letter assignments.
0
Big Business Goals? Which KPIs Will Help You

The most successful MSPs rely on metrics – known as key performance indicators (KPIs) – for making informed decisions that help their businesses thrive, rather than just survive. This eBook provides an overview of the most important KPIs used by top MSPs.

Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
This is no problem IF you do the following:

(a)  Resize the C: partition to the size of your current G: partition (so an image restore will work okay)

(b)  IMAGE the C: partition

(c)  Change the label of the old C: partition (so you won't have two partitions with the same label after the next step

(d)  Restore the image to the partition that is now G:

(e)  Set the restored partition Active.

(f)  Modify the BOOT.INI file on the restored partition to "point" to the 2nd partition of the drive (since that's what you want to boot to).

(g)  Change the hard drive boot order in the BIOS to boot from the 2nd drive.  (or simply rejumper the 2nd drive as primary and remove the old drive --> since you indicated you wanted to get rid of the drive)

DONE.   Just boot and your system will be C:   You can then re-assign drive letters for the other 3 partitions to make them whatever you'd like.

The above can easily be accomplished with the free demo download of BOOT-It NG and the companion EDITBINI program => both available at www.bootitng.com

... I'm going to be gone until later tonight --> others can probably walk you through the steps to do this.  If not, just post back and I'll respond when I get back.  (Note:  Do NOT try to do this with MaxBlast)
0
Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
Note:  You can store the Image on an external drive; or on one of the other (NOT the one you want to restore it to) partitions on the 2nd drive (if there's room).   Either will work fine.
0
brakk0Commented:
You can try this:
http://gparted.sourceforge.net/livecd.php

download, burn to a cd, boot from the new cd.

It should let you copy the C partition to the G partition (though they probably won't be called "c" or "g" while you're booting from the CD)

Make the destination partition active, shutdown, remove the old C drive, and it should boot from your second drive. If it all works right, windows will think the new partition is C and you won't have to do any hacks to boot.ini or registry or anything.

***BACKUP EVERYTHING YOU WANT TO KEEP FIRST***
0
MikeMCSDAuthor Commented:
thanks everyone for the ideas . . .
To tell the truth, I'm a little nervous about trying them. I don't
have the patience with Hardware that I used to.
The easiest way for me to do this would probably be to just buy another
hard drive and move C: on it.  
BTW, the reason I am doing this is:

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Hardware/Q_22046443.html
0
Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
"... BTW, the reason I am doing this is ..." ==>  Then STOP !!   In fact, your system partition (60GB) is larger than it should be already ... you don't need to move it anywhere (in fact, I'd shrink it to 25GB or so and keep image of it handy for restoral ... but that's another question/discussion).

The performance issue with your other drive is probably easily resolved.   I'll post the details there.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Hardware

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.