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Copy partition then rename to C:

Posted on 2006-11-01
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Last Modified: 2010-04-26
I have one hard drive with just a C: partition.
I have a second hard drive with F: G: H: I: partitions.

I want to use the second hard drive as the main hard drive
and get rid of the one drive with C:

I want to copy the C: drive to the G: partition of the other drive,
and then rename the G: to C:

How can I accomplish this?
Can I do this with the have MaxBlast3 software CD
that came with the second drive?  thanks
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Question by:MikeMCSD
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8 Comments
 
LVL 69

Assisted Solution

by:Callandor
Callandor earned 400 total points
ID: 17850705
You might be able to do this, but it is not simple: http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;Q223188

Make sure you have a backup, in case it doesn't work.
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LVL 16

Author Comment

by:MikeMCSD
ID: 17850756
thanks Call . .
it says on the MaxBlast3 software that I can boot to the that CD, but it
didn't boot to it when I tried it. Do I need to change something in the BIOS first?
I'm thinking I can change the drive letter with that software, but
not sure.
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LVL 69

Expert Comment

by:Callandor
ID: 17850823
The MaxBlast3 software is for cloning hard drives - it can't change drive letter assignments.
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LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:garycase
ID: 17851159
This is no problem IF you do the following:

(a)  Resize the C: partition to the size of your current G: partition (so an image restore will work okay)

(b)  IMAGE the C: partition

(c)  Change the label of the old C: partition (so you won't have two partitions with the same label after the next step

(d)  Restore the image to the partition that is now G:

(e)  Set the restored partition Active.

(f)  Modify the BOOT.INI file on the restored partition to "point" to the 2nd partition of the drive (since that's what you want to boot to).

(g)  Change the hard drive boot order in the BIOS to boot from the 2nd drive.  (or simply rejumper the 2nd drive as primary and remove the old drive --> since you indicated you wanted to get rid of the drive)

DONE.   Just boot and your system will be C:   You can then re-assign drive letters for the other 3 partitions to make them whatever you'd like.

The above can easily be accomplished with the free demo download of BOOT-It NG and the companion EDITBINI program => both available at www.bootitng.com

... I'm going to be gone until later tonight --> others can probably walk you through the steps to do this.  If not, just post back and I'll respond when I get back.  (Note:  Do NOT try to do this with MaxBlast)
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LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:garycase
ID: 17851175
Note:  You can store the Image on an external drive; or on one of the other (NOT the one you want to restore it to) partitions on the 2nd drive (if there's room).   Either will work fine.
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LVL 10

Assisted Solution

by:brakk0
brakk0 earned 400 total points
ID: 17851686
You can try this:
http://gparted.sourceforge.net/livecd.php

download, burn to a cd, boot from the new cd.

It should let you copy the C partition to the G partition (though they probably won't be called "c" or "g" while you're booting from the CD)

Make the destination partition active, shutdown, remove the old C drive, and it should boot from your second drive. If it all works right, windows will think the new partition is C and you won't have to do any hacks to boot.ini or registry or anything.

***BACKUP EVERYTHING YOU WANT TO KEEP FIRST***
0
 
LVL 16

Author Comment

by:MikeMCSD
ID: 17857367
thanks everyone for the ideas . . .
To tell the truth, I'm a little nervous about trying them. I don't
have the patience with Hardware that I used to.
The easiest way for me to do this would probably be to just buy another
hard drive and move C: on it.  
BTW, the reason I am doing this is:

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Hardware/Q_22046443.html
0
 
LVL 70

Accepted Solution

by:
garycase earned 1200 total points
ID: 17858696
"... BTW, the reason I am doing this is ..." ==>  Then STOP !!   In fact, your system partition (60GB) is larger than it should be already ... you don't need to move it anywhere (in fact, I'd shrink it to 25GB or so and keep image of it handy for restoral ... but that's another question/discussion).

The performance issue with your other drive is probably easily resolved.   I'll post the details there.
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