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RHEL 4 fresh installation: Mount points and partition sizes?

Posted on 2006-11-01
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I have a new Dell server which will house RHEL4. The installation CD suggests the following partion and mount structrue (all values in MB)

/ = 1024
/boot = 100
swap = 1756
/usr = 24346
/home = 13533
/tmp = 512
/var = 512

Now this totals only 41783MB (or 41.7GB). My hard drive is 75GB. Why is this the recomended/default sizes? Only 1024MB for / is EXTREMELY small, isnt it? We have two applications that will be running on this server: inventory system, accounting system. All data for these two applications will sit on a DAS (directly attached storage) system which has approx 200GB of space. Everything else will sit on this server's local 75GB hard drive.

Are there any other recommendations for partion sizes to make the most use out of my 75GB? I have found very vauge documentation on the web for this.

Thank you.
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Question by:bfilipek
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ygoutham earned 250 total points
ID: 17855806
recommendations are made only as an optimum size.  the actual usage can vary depending on implementation.  i would suggest a bigger size for /var.  from what you are saying then it might be a database or something else.

what you can do is mount all free space available on / (which is one of the options while formatting the disk and partitioning it).  eliminate the restriction on /tmp also or keep it if you must.  think about more space in

/home
/

but the following really do not occupy that much space

/usr
/var

the /usr and /var are going to be the places some of the applications to be installed in and running out of (mysql, mail, http, ftp etc). so depending on your installation requirement, you can appropriately size them.  a full installation of RHEL4 should not need more than 5 to 6 Gb of disk. which only suggests that a 24 GB /usr is going to be never utilised.  whereas root and the users on the system would be occupying the / and /home respectively. so one might consider allocating the correct sizes for that.

swap can be twice that of actual memory available with a cap of 2 GB.  

if you are not sure then go with default

/boot = 100
/swap = 2 x actual memory
/data = create one for yourself where you want to store any data / download / misc items
/ = all the rest of free space to begin with

then one can always add a disk and mout the space on any of the directories available

goutham
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by:bimal_linux
bimal_linux earned 250 total points
ID: 17864595
I would suggest to keep /var in big size (give 30 G). /var will be under heavy usage because of log generation. Since you have a data storage attached, dont worry about space. /boot and swap can be given as gautham said

Rest all you can equally distribute. Its always better to keep /tmp in a seperate folder and give 5G. That is another place where junk data can accumulate.

Good Luck..
Bimal Mankara
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by:bfilipek
ID: 17889908
So if I assign the following:

/boot = 100
/swap = 2 x actual mem
/ = remaining

This will allow my /var, /usr/, and /home directories to use any of the remaining space on / , correct?
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by:bfilipek
ID: 17907441
You guys out there? :)
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by:ygoutham
ID: 17911995
yes, you are correct.
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by:bimal_linux
ID: 17912360
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