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How to move data from linux box to new 2003SBS

fessiambre
fessiambre asked
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Last Modified: 2011-10-03
hi experts I have a linux box running redhat 9.0 with the IP of 192.168.0.and a new 2003 SBS server on 192.168.16.2 I am moving the users off of the linux box and putting them on the SBS server I need to move all the home folders to the SBS. The linux box is already a samba box and the computers on the network have access to it I cannot connect to it from the windows server it sees it but no connection and when I try to connect to the windows server from the linux box the authentication box pops up but will not connect to browse the shares on the server2003. What is the best and quickest way to get the files over to the windows box thanks.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process Advisor
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Commented:
Best and Quickest?  Depends on your skills.  you could use FTP... or rather than hacking around the SBS registry to disable smb signing, I'd probably just grad an external USB hard drive and copy the files from linux to that hard drive (formatted as FAT32) and then attach the drive to the SBS system and copy them back.  There are several other options... but I'd probably go this route at the moment.

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Commented:
I am a linux newbie will I have to mount the drive in linux?
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process Advisor
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Commented:
Not sure on redhat 9.0... that's kinda old.  You MIGHT.  As an alternative, you might try to download a copy of Knoppix and boot that.  That will automount the USB drive and then you can copy the data through knoppix - www.knoppix.net.

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Commented:
use robocopy - as your linux box is a samba server, and robocopy supports unc paths you'll be fine, so long as we can make you connect to it :)

You've mis-typed the IP address for the linux box. Are all your machines on the same subnet? If they are, and you are still faced with no connection from server, but OK from clients you could use robocopy from a workstation.

robocopy \\linux\share \\sbs\share /e /copyall /r:5 /w:5 would copy from the unc path on the linux to the unc path on the server, /e will do all files and subfolders including empty ones, and copyall will migrate file attributes. the /r (retry) and /w (wait) values should be set, as the defaults of one million retries at 30 seconds apart means a fairly long wait for a non-accessible file to copy.

You might also add a /log:logfile.txt to capture the output.

Author

Commented:
do I run the robo copy from the windows machine? what about permissions? will the linux machine let robo copy access it?

Commented:
ok...

If you can, then run robocopy from the server, it will be faster.

If you cannot, then running it from a client will work, but the data will transfer via the client, so the client will be downloadng and uploading simultaneously, so there may be some contention...

the "\copyall" will include the permissions, so if the user's SIDs are unchanged, then they should be fine.

If you can access the samba share, then so can robocopy.

in case you were wondering - robocopy is a part of the windows 2003 resource kit tools... http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=9d467a69-57ff-4ae7-96ee-b18c4790cffd&DisplayLang=en

Principal Consultant
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Commented:
I'm wondering how all this happened to begin with... because if you "joined" your SBS to a Linux based network... then you most likely will have more problems than just getting the files from the old server.

Because if the computers on the network have access to it, and your SBS doesn't, then your workstations aren't configured properly for the SBS.  

If they were, you could then join the Linux server to your SBS Network if you wanted... (as long as it's PDC functionality was disabled).

Jeff
TechSoEasy

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Commented:
Techsoeasy I will clarify this. The SBS server is brand new it has a new domain and ipsubnet differnt from the existing linux network. The linux box is running samba and is a domain called DC1.  have the sbs server pluged into the network I can see the linux server but when I try to access it from the network neighborhood it tries to authenticate me with a username password box, I have created a user with the same credentials as the windows machine and tried the root and password it will not let me in. The same goes from the linux machine browsing for the sbs it sees it but will not let me in. The only thing I want to do is get the home dir off the linux box and onto the windows box.
Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal Consultant
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Commented:
But you say you can access the linux box from the workstations?  If so, then copy the home dir onto a workstation and then from there onto the SBS.

Jeff
TechSoEasy
Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal Consultant
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Commented:
You could also do it with a USB External Hard Drive.

Jeff
TechSoEasy

Author

Commented:
The workstations are on the linux  domain at this point. They can access the new windows domain but I dont know how to access the main home directory where the users files are. I can only seem to access the individual file. Do you know how I can acces them all. Will the proper permissions of course.
Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal Consultant
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Commented:
Okay, so you're setting up an entirely new network... why can't you move the data over as I suggested above?

Jeff
TechSoEasy

Author

Commented:
I am going to try the above suggestions and I really appreciate all the advice I will let you know thanks.

Author

Commented:
I will split the points your commments were all valid however I choose the knoppix solution it was the easiest thanks to all.
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