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Slow logon to 2003 Server

Posted on 2006-11-05
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What can I do to speed up my logon from the client machines to the server
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Question by:jontyplatt
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Netman66 earned 1000 total points
ID: 17877029
Most of the time slow logons is due to the fact that you have the ISP DNS server on the client machines and not your own DNS server.  Make sure DNS is setup properly - all clients and servers inside your network will point exclusively to your DNS servers.  Use Forwarding in the properties of your DNS to send requests to the ISP.

Next, make sure if you use Roaming profiles that they are kept small.

Lastly, keep the number of GPOs you use to a bare minimum since each and every GPO must be parsed during logon.


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by:Kevin Hays
ID: 17878501
Other than what Netman66 said, which I would suspect you have your clients dns entries pointing toward either your ISP's dns servers or a router by chance and not your DNS server.  If you are using roaming profiles you might want to think about folder redirection also.

You could post the IP configuration of your client machine for us to look at :)
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Author Comment

by:jontyplatt
ID: 17887969
no the DNS is set to the DNS server locally. is it better to have the DNS on ther server or on teh router? Do I need to statically assigne teh DNS on teh client machines - will this make it quicker?
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by:Kevin Hays
ID: 17888890
Typically in a windows environment with a domain a simple setup would be as follows.

ServerA
- DNS
- DHCP
- DC
TCP Info:
IP: 192.168.1.2
Netmask: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: IP of your router

ServerA resides inside your LAN.  You would want all of your workstations to obtain IP automatically in a large environment.  DHCP will also hand out and give the correct DNS entries for your workstations also.  If you are not using DHCP and you are statically assigning IP's on your workstations then you will want to go ahead and assign the DNS server IP to use which would be (192.168.1.2).  Remember, this is just ficticious IP's for examples only :)

I would rather have the DNS running as a service on my DC, but lots of people use the builtin DNS/dhcp that many routers use also though.
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