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Haskell -

Posted on 2006-11-05
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Last Modified: 2010-04-16
Given that I have the following function:

-- This function constructs InputData where InputData is either a line of words ex "Hi there. Oh it's Bob!" or
-- it is a word in which to search the string  ex "?Bob"
inputline :: String -> InputData
inputline (x:xs)
  | x == '?' =  Search xs
  | otherwise = Line (x:xs)

so for example:
inputline "hello bob"
returns > Line "hello bob"

What I can figure out is how to pass this inputline data type into a function, and then return just the string part.  

Help please??
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Question by:twibblejaway
2 Comments
 
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VoteyDisciple earned 500 total points
ID: 17878791
I've never seen Haskell before, but I'm gonna take a shot and suppose it works similar to OCaml in its pattern matching:

undoit  :: InputData -> String
undoit (Line (x))
    = x
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Author Comment

by:twibblejaway
ID: 17879185
Very nice shot
0

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