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VB.net exe - view Debug.print lines

Posted on 2006-11-06
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I'd like to view the debug.print lines when running as an exe, just like you can view them in the IDE - can this be done and how?
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Question by:rwallacej
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AlexFM earned 200 total points
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Download DebugView utility from here:
http://www.sysinternals.com/utilities/debugview.html
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by:rwallacej
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can this not be done without 3rd party tool?
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by:vsvb
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by:vsvb
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this is not 3 party tool just open the project and add the code in your current porject
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by:AlexFM
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You want this outside of Visual Studio, so you must run some program, right?
DebugView is free tool which is used by all C++ developers. .NET debug lines are shown as well. Download link points to zip file with DebugView.exe and help file - pretty simple. Add you need is to run DebugView.exe and your program.
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by:rwallacej
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got called away, I'll look at these tomorrow. thanks
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by:Kinger247
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Why don't you write them off to a text file ?

I place the debug.pring statement in a proc, then call the proc.
So if your running your app as an exe, you can change the proc to write to a textfile instead.
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by:chrsmrtn
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Can't you attach to the process while it's running?  I've done this to help debug a process that i wrote recently in VB.net.  All you do is make sure the process is running.  Open your .NET development project for the compiled exe.  Place in your breakpoints.  Click on Tools, then select "Attach Process".  Then find the name of the exe in the list of processes and click "Attach".  Wait a bit and a break point should light up.
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