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Why  IS my network working?

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Last Modified: 2013-11-09
Lengthy description here.....

I pulled Cat 5e UTP into 2 rooms in my basement. We finished it a little later and I just now got around to moving my existing system to my new office/shop.

I have Hughes Sat. Internet. The "modem" for the system is basically a firmware controlled computer (DW7000 for those that want to see the specs). The network on the system is more like a shared internet connection then an actual network. From the modem I go into a netgear 5 port switch. Out of the switch into a netgear WAP, my office and my shop.

Initially I terminated the cable ends at the switch to the "A" standard and in the rooms to the "A" standard as well. This configuration did not work. I should note that in this system there are no crossover cables, as they weren't needed when this setup was in my living room (read: without the 60' in wall patch cables). I tried a crossover cable in various positions with no positive results, cable isn't even being recognized as being plugged in.

Upon a screw up, I put the plug on backwards, that is to say "B" standard with the exposed bars facing down. I decided to try this and wired my plug to the other end to the"A" standard. It works.....it works well,"100Mbps" well.

Half of me says " You won, walk away"   but the geek in me needs to know why.
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Pete LongTechnical Architect
CERTIFIED EXPERT
Distinguished Expert 2019

Commented:
did you fit sockets http://www.petenetlive.com/Tech/Networking/networking2.htm

or just crimp the sockets on http://www.petenetlive.com/Tech/Networking/networking1.htm

The only reason that there are two standards is - the send cicuit (orange and white orange) needs to speak to a recieve circuit (Green and white green)
I might be reading something wrong, but I think you turned your crossover cable into a patch cable which of course would explain why it works.  Your switch must not be of the auto-sensing type.

Author

Commented:
The way the switch side of the cable is best described is, set up cable for standard "B" flip it over so pin one is now pin eight , two is seven, and on...  It's not a crossover it's some hybrid oddity.


And the switch side is crimp the room side is a punchdown wall adapter.

thanks guys
Technical Architect
CERTIFIED EXPERT
Distinguished Expert 2019
Commented:
That is NOT a crossover thats a rollover - and you are correct it should NOT work, a rollover is only used these days for terminal connections NOT network connections

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Well in that case maybe you have a smart auto-sensor on your switch and it rolled around your I/O so it would work correctly.
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