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One Computer Cannot RDP Over VPN

Posted on 2006-11-09
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Last Modified: 2010-03-18
Well, mostly.

Computer A) Laptop running XP Pro. User's home computer, is used both at office and at home and when user is out with clients.
Computer B) Desktop, strictly at the office. XP Pr.
Server) SBS2003, running as the DC, and VPN Server.
Computer C) My computer. Desktop. XP Pro, nothing to do with this company what so ever.

User wants computer A to connect to computer B via RDP. To enable this, we've set up a VPN connection that works fine for everyone concerned. Computer A cannot RDP to Computer B, when on the same network, when on the same network and connected through VPN, when on different networks over VPN.

So, ok, it's a firewall issue with computer A, but, computer A can RDP to Server. And from there can RDP to Computer B.

So it's an issue with computer B, but I can connect to computer B from computer C when I VPN to the network.

Server can RDP to computer A and B.

Any ideas?
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Question by:RobbieCrash
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7 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:zephyr_hex (Megan)
ID: 17907285
are these RDP's always within the same network?
are the IP's internal?
are there any firewalls/routers between these computers?
here is an idea:  computer A can not RDP to B because there is a firewall between them...
it's possible that A can RDP to the server because either there isn't a firewall between A and the server, or that firewall has port forwarding to the server for RDP.  the server can RDP to B because either there isn't a firewall between B and the server, or the firewall has been configured.
not sure if that's correct... because i'm not really sure about the structure of your network.

are you able to ping B from A?
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Author Comment

by:RobbieCrash
ID: 17907509
RDPs are within the same network, because of the VPN.

IPs are internal.

The firewalls are external or bypassed by the VPN.

There's no port forwarding, nor any firewalls messing with internal network traffic.

Computer A can ping B, C and the server.
Computer B can ping A, C and the server.
the server can ping Computer B, A and C.
Computer C can ping A, B and the server.
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Accepted Solution

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RobbieCrash earned 0 total points
ID: 17907843
Turns out the user did not think that when I asked about firewall or anti-virus software installed on her computer I meant firewall or antivirus software.

Another problem fixed by uninstalling Norton.
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Expert Comment

by:Steve Knight
ID: 17909432
Haha, Norton Internet Security s/w rides again.... software firewalls are a PITA in corporate environments!  You know how to close the question as 'own answer' presumably...
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Expert Comment

by:Steve Knight
ID: 18934065
Ok by me.
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