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Setting up Exchange 2003 for Web Use

Current Network Config:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ISP STATIC ADDR:  xx.xxx.xx.x  (Assigned by ISP)

ROUTER:       Gateway 192.168.0.1  
Port forwarding as follows:
   HTTP  80  192.168.0.20  (Web Server, IIS, SQL Server 2005)
   SMTP 25  192.168.0.21  (Exchange Server 2003)
   POP   110 192.168.0.21  (Exchange Server 2003)

SERVER #1:  W2K# Ent Server // (web server) IIS 6.0 + SQL Server 2005
* Also is DNS, Domain Controller, AD

SERVER #2:  W2K# Ent Server // (Exchange Server) IIS 6.0 w/ SMTP
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Both boxes share the same static IP offered by the ISP

QUESTION:

I want to host and administer Exchange for several domains online.  
If the web server box is hosting about 100 webs, how do I make sure that people can log into the Exchange server?  
So if the ISP DNS Host record for "mydomain.com" points to xx.xxx.xx.x   (Static IP from ISP)
and if MX records point to mail."mydomain.com" xx.xxx.xx.x (Static IP from ISP)

How can I get internet users to view their mail online?  
What is the exchange setup protocol in this situation?  

Thanks!
0
kibbs
Asked:
kibbs
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2 Solutions
 
poweruser32Commented:
owa is the most popular feature of exchange 2003
users can access their email through their browser at https://mydomain.com/exchange 
for security reasons you need to get a cert installed for owa (either 3rd party or your own) and open port 443 on your firewall
it elimates the need for pop too
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kibbsAuthor Commented:
does the cert go on the web server or the exchange server?  
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SembeeCommented:
Purchase an SSL certificate, and place it on the Exchange server. GoDaddy for $20 or RapidSSL for $60. Both will be fine.
Then direct port 443 to your Exchange server.
On the web server you could even create a new directory called "Exchange" and then put in a small redirect snippet to direct users to the SSL version, which will send them across to the Exchange server.

Simon.
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kibbsAuthor Commented:
Cant i create my own cert with Win2K3 Enterprise?  ?  
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SembeeCommented:
You can, but you shouldn't.

A home grown certificate will generate warnings for the users when they connect, will flag red in internet explorer 7.0 and generally looks poor. For $20 you get a much better effect.

See my blog for more reasons why a self generated certificate is a bad idea.
http://www.sembee.co.uk/archive/2006/03/05/Self-Generated-versus-Commercial-SSL-Certificates.aspx

Simon.
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kibbsAuthor Commented:
Okay, I bought the cert. its setup for the FQDN..  I've got two IIS, one on my web server and the other on the exchange server..
Sorry I have to ask this next question..  but, what next?  

On my local web server (also a dns) I can setup any domain that we have registered..  how do I forward it to the exchange IIS?  
By the way Sembee, nice blog.. really informative and well written.  
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SembeeCommented:
On your router, open port 443 and direct it to the Exchange server. Thats it.

You could setup a split DNS system so that the SSL certificate works internally as well without any certificate prompts.
http://www.amset.info/netadmin/split-dns.asp

Simon.
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