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Setting up Exchange 2003 for Web Use

Posted on 2006-11-09
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Last Modified: 2010-03-06
Current Network Config:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ISP STATIC ADDR:  xx.xxx.xx.x  (Assigned by ISP)

ROUTER:       Gateway 192.168.0.1  
Port forwarding as follows:
   HTTP  80  192.168.0.20  (Web Server, IIS, SQL Server 2005)
   SMTP 25  192.168.0.21  (Exchange Server 2003)
   POP   110 192.168.0.21  (Exchange Server 2003)

SERVER #1:  W2K# Ent Server // (web server) IIS 6.0 + SQL Server 2005
* Also is DNS, Domain Controller, AD

SERVER #2:  W2K# Ent Server // (Exchange Server) IIS 6.0 w/ SMTP
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Both boxes share the same static IP offered by the ISP

QUESTION:

I want to host and administer Exchange for several domains online.  
If the web server box is hosting about 100 webs, how do I make sure that people can log into the Exchange server?  
So if the ISP DNS Host record for "mydomain.com" points to xx.xxx.xx.x   (Static IP from ISP)
and if MX records point to mail."mydomain.com" xx.xxx.xx.x (Static IP from ISP)

How can I get internet users to view their mail online?  
What is the exchange setup protocol in this situation?  

Thanks!
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Question by:kibbs
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7 Comments
 
LVL 16

Accepted Solution

by:
poweruser32 earned 250 total points
ID: 17907488
owa is the most popular feature of exchange 2003
users can access their email through their browser at https://mydomain.com/exchange 
for security reasons you need to get a cert installed for owa (either 3rd party or your own) and open port 443 on your firewall
it elimates the need for pop too
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Author Comment

by:kibbs
ID: 17907791
does the cert go on the web server or the exchange server?  
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LVL 104

Assisted Solution

by:Sembee
Sembee earned 250 total points
ID: 17907862
Purchase an SSL certificate, and place it on the Exchange server. GoDaddy for $20 or RapidSSL for $60. Both will be fine.
Then direct port 443 to your Exchange server.
On the web server you could even create a new directory called "Exchange" and then put in a small redirect snippet to direct users to the SSL version, which will send them across to the Exchange server.

Simon.
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Author Comment

by:kibbs
ID: 17909046
Cant i create my own cert with Win2K3 Enterprise?  ?  
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LVL 104

Expert Comment

by:Sembee
ID: 17909171
You can, but you shouldn't.

A home grown certificate will generate warnings for the users when they connect, will flag red in internet explorer 7.0 and generally looks poor. For $20 you get a much better effect.

See my blog for more reasons why a self generated certificate is a bad idea.
http://www.sembee.co.uk/archive/2006/03/05/Self-Generated-versus-Commercial-SSL-Certificates.aspx

Simon.
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Author Comment

by:kibbs
ID: 17910026
Okay, I bought the cert. its setup for the FQDN..  I've got two IIS, one on my web server and the other on the exchange server..
Sorry I have to ask this next question..  but, what next?  

On my local web server (also a dns) I can setup any domain that we have registered..  how do I forward it to the exchange IIS?  
By the way Sembee, nice blog.. really informative and well written.  
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LVL 104

Expert Comment

by:Sembee
ID: 17910114
On your router, open port 443 and direct it to the Exchange server. Thats it.

You could setup a split DNS system so that the SSL certificate works internally as well without any certificate prompts.
http://www.amset.info/netadmin/split-dns.asp

Simon.
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