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Custom Regular Expression

First of all, is that an oxymoron?

I need a regular expression that is designed to handle a customer's account #. I know the format of the account number but it can change (dashes, spaces, last digit optional) so I'm not sure how to write this expression. I figure somebody who knows this stuff well could write it without too much trouble or at least point me in the right direction. Thanks!

The # is printed on the bill like this:   00-0000000 0    so 2 digits, dash, 7 digits, space, last digit

In the field where they enter their customer #, they may or may not enter the dash after the first two digits and may or may not enter the space before the last digit. I also want to make the last single digit optional all together. Please let me know if I did not explain that well enough. Thanks in advance.
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megel6805
Asked:
megel6805
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1 Solution
 
muzzy2003Commented:
Try this:

\d{2}-?\d{7} ?\d{0,1}
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muzzy2003Commented:
Sorry - forgot beginning and end:

^\d{2}-?\d{7} ?\d{0,1}$
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sandip132Commented:
Quantifiers provide a simple way to specify within a pattern how many times a particular character or set of characters is allowed to repeat itself.

*, which describes "0 or more occurrences",
+, which describes "1 or more occurrences", and
?, which describes "0 or 1 occurrence".

To learn to create regular expressions ref. this :
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms972966.aspx

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muzzy2003Commented:
In this case, I have used the quantifiers {n} for exactly n and {n,m} for between n and m. The last one could obviously be written \d? or \d{0,1}.
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megel6805Author Commented:
thanks!
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muzzy2003Commented:
No problem.
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