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Exchange 2000 Connectors For mulitple Send Domains

I setup my POP3 email domains to forward to exchange so my users wouldn't have to use POP3 to retrieve mail into there exchange mail.  I have 2 domain users (domain1.com and domain2.com) that are coming into my exchange server now on a single Virtual SMTP.  They are currently being forwarded from my external SMTP server to my exchange server.

I have each user configured with the correct send domain and there emails are being received by the outside world with the correct reply to Domain.

My domain is behind a managed firewall with NAT.  When users send out of exchange, the firewall IP becomes the IP it appears the email is coming from resulting in a reverse DNS failure.  I would like to keep my external SMTP the same.

Can I configure exchange such that domain1.com email sent will go through my external domain1.com smtp and domain2.com email sent will go through my external domain2.com smtp?  I am assuming this is a SMTP connector function but need a little guidance in configuration.

Thanks.
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jeffreyscottsmith
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jeffreyscottsmith
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1 Solution
 
SembeeCommented:
Unfortunately Exchange routes its email based on the recipient, not the sender. So trying to manipulate the email in that manner is not possible.
What I usually suggest with multiple domains is that everything is identical. The same host is used in the MX records and then the reverse DNS and SMTP banner will match.

Simon.
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jeffreyscottsmithAuthor Commented:
I understand.

My outside SMTP server only allows to relay for local users on the server or authenticated users, so I will need to use a user/password to relay for my exchange email.  Since I don't see a place to put any authentication information in the smart host area for the virtual SMTP, does that mean I need to use a connector?
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SembeeCommented:
You should not be putting smart hosts on the SMTP virtual server. That causes nothing but problems. Always use an SMTP Connector. An SMTP Connector also allows you to authenticate if required for a smart host server.

Simon.
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jeffreyscottsmithAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your help.

If I don't use a smart host, what would the connector actually be doing?  Give me the purpose in a nutshell.
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SembeeCommented:
You don't actually need an SMTP Connector for email to be delivered. Exchange will deliver the email directly using MX records.

If you need a smart host then it should always be on a SMTP Connector rather than the SMTP virtual server. On the SMTP VS it overrides everything else. The most common problem is when you introduce a second Exchange server and find that email isn't delivered correctly.

SMTP Connectors give you control over the email flow. For example by using multiple SMTP Connectors you could send email in different directions depending on where it is based. The classic example is with AOL. You could send email for AOL via your ISPs SMTP Server as a smart host and allow all other email to be delivered directly by DNS.

You can also use SMTP Connectors to restrict email flow, such as email size and permissions. They are used if you have a subset of users who should not be able to send email to the internet for example.

Simon.
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jeffreyscottsmithAuthor Commented:
Ok, so if I point my internal dns for mail.domain1.com and mail.domain2.com to my external mail servers, mail will be sent from them?
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jeffreyscottsmithAuthor Commented:
I don't think in my comments about that is what you meant.  I am sure the exchange SMTP VC is sending the mail.  Am I correct?
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SembeeCommented:
The SMTP virtual server always sends the email.
What an SMTP Connector does is allow you to manipulate what Exchange does with the email.

As for your earlier question...

"Ok, so if I point my internal dns for mail.domain1.com and mail.domain2.com to my external mail servers, mail will be sent from them?"

I have no idea what you mean.

Simon.
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jeffreyscottsmithAuthor Commented:
Sorry, it sounds as if you meant that with the dns pointing to an external mail server, exchange would uses that smtp to relay.  I didn't think that was the case.

All is clear now.  Thanks.  This can be closed.
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