Move data between File Servers

I need to move all the data from my old file server (win 2003 std) to a new file server (windows storage server 2003).
The amount of data is not much, only 60GB worth of data which includes the my organization's public drive and all the User's Home folders.
The current file server is the DC and I'm trying to move it to our new NAS unit. Can I connect both servers using one of those special USB cables and transfer data or is there a better way of doing it?
I'm not sure if I've posted this question in the right area, please advise. Thanks.
emkaydAsked:
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inbarasanConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Dear emkayd,
Better way to deal this is to take the backup using Ntbackup to a file and restore the same to the new server. This way the process of copying files will be fast and also your ACL's will be intact. You just need to create the Share and share permissions.

I use to do the same way. It works perfectly fine. Hope this helps

Cheers!
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emkaydAuthor Commented:
Thanks Inbarasan, By NtBackup you mean the backup utility that comes with Windows 2003 right? (ntbackup.exe)
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inbarasanCommented:
yes
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Steve KnightConnect With a Mentor IT ConsultancyCommented:
Personally I do this sort of thing using Robocopy or Xcopy over the network. The reason being you can do it something like this as most of the data often doesn't change much:

* Robocopy all data to new server including permissions - this can be more of an issue if you have the "MS standard" way of doing permissions with global groups put in local groups and local groups on the data.  By doing it in advance you can check this out if necessary before the 'big bang' and can copy the data during off peak hours if the network is busy.

* Setup new shares in all the correct places (or if there a lot create a script to do it using output from net share on original server)

* When ready to copy remove shares from old server or make them read only

* Robocopy / Xcopy again to syncronise changes (often only takes minutes)

* Change user's login scripts or mappings to point to new server

* When happy delete / remove the old data area / shares.

The switch robocopy /MIR will synchronise two areas including deleting files from the destination that are no longer in the source.  If you want advice on any of he other switches please ask.  Otherwise you can use

xcopy /d/s/e/y/o/k/r/h D:\source\*.*\\otherserver\d$\dest\*.*

from the old server which copies newer files, subdirectotires, overwrites existing file, copies permissions, attributes, read only files and hidden / system files

hth

Steve
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emkaydAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the lesson Steve. I think I will probably use this approach.
Inbarasan,
Your method sounds very simple and easy as well. I tried backing up just my home directory on the server and tried restoring it to the new NAS unit but the process stops with a report saying "The volume "E:" is not responding". But I was able to restore it successfully on my local machine. I don't know why it wouldn't do it on the server though. Any ideas.
I created a primary partition on the NAS unit as a Basic NTFS formatted disk with a drive letter.
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inbarasanCommented:
I think you are trying to restore the data to E drive which is not existing in your NAS. Try to check that and change the location to a drive which is existing in your NAS. Then do the test

Best of luck
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emkaydAuthor Commented:
Thanks Inbarasan, that was not the problem I wasn't doing the restore properly which I found later. Anyway I didn't use robocopy so I'll accept your solution and split the points between you and Steve. Thanks both of you.
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