?
Solved

dynamically allocating  an object

Posted on 2006-11-13
7
Medium Priority
?
189 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-01
I am trying to dynamically allocate an object of type ourClass, please advise if I am correct ?
            typedef ourClass* ourClassPtrType;
            ourClassPtrType ourClassPtr;
            ourClassPtr = new ourClass;
Thanks.
0
Comment
Question by:Gipsy
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
7 Comments
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:aescnt
ID: 17933172
Looks just about right. Why don't you try it?
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:_iskywalker_
ID: 17933296
i would do a:
ourClassPtr = new ourClass();
if it fails, but i am not sure, for more point i would try more ;)
0
 
LVL 7

Accepted Solution

by:
UrosVidojevic earned 80 total points
ID: 17934309
You don't need to create type ourClassPtrType to dynamically allocate an object of class ourClass.

It is usually done like this:

ourClass {
     // definition of your class.
};

int main() {
...
ourClass* ourClassPtr = new ourClass();
// now ourClassPtr is a pointer to a dynamically allocated object of your class.
}

If you realy need type ourClassPtrType, you can do same thing:

ourClass {
      // definition of your class.
};

typedef ourClass* ourClassPtrType;

int main() {
     ourClassPtrType ourClassPtr = new ourClass();
// now ourClassPtr is a pointer to a dynamically allocated object of your class.
}
0
VIDEO: THE CONCERTO CLOUD FOR HEALTHCARE

Modern healthcare requires a modern cloud. View this brief video to understand how the Concerto Cloud for Healthcare can help your organization.

 
LVL 15

Expert Comment

by:efn
ID: 17944731
You don't need the parentheses on the new expression.

ourClass* ourClassPtr = new ourClass();
ourClass* ourClassPtr = new ourClass;

These both do the same thing, so the lack of parentheses was not a flaw in the code in the question.
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:SeanDurkin
ID: 21427218
No comment has been added to this question in more than 21 days, so it is now classified as abandoned.

I will leave the following recommendation for this question in the Cleanup Zone:
  Accept: UrosVidojevic {http:#17934309}

Any objections should be posted here in the next 4 days. After that time, the question will be closed.

Sean Durkin
Experts Exchange Cleanup Volunteer
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:Computer101
ID: 21449007
Forced accept.

Computer101
EE Admin
0

Featured Post

What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

What is C++ STL?: STL stands for Standard Template Library and is a part of standard C++ libraries. It contains many useful data structures (containers) and algorithms, which can spare you a lot of the time. Today we will look at the STL Vector. …
Go is an acronym of golang, is a programming language developed Google in 2007. Go is a new language that is mostly in the C family, with significant input from Pascal/Modula/Oberon family. Hence Go arisen as low-level language with fast compilation…
The goal of the video will be to teach the user the concept of local variables and scope. An example of a locally defined variable will be given as well as an explanation of what scope is in C++. The local variable and concept of scope will be relat…
The viewer will learn additional member functions of the vector class. Specifically, the capacity and swap member functions will be introduced.

777 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question