Solved

Using Crontab

Posted on 2006-11-13
1
314 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-27
I am trying to figure out the schedule of a cron job. When I type crontab -l I get the following:
02 10 * * * cd /u01; ./job1.bash

I think it means the job is run every day at 10:02 but I am not sure. Could someone please clarify? Thanks!
0
Comment
Question by:sikyala
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
1 Comment
 
LVL 48

Accepted Solution

by:
Tintin earned 125 total points
ID: 17933758
Yes, means the job runs everyday at 10:02am

man crontab

  crontab Entry Format
     A crontab file consists of lines of  six  fields  each.  The
     fields  are  separated by spaces or tabs. The first five are
     integer patterns that specify the following:

     minute (0-59),
     hour (0-23),
     day of the month (1-31),
     month of the year (1-12),
     day of the week (0-6 with 0=Sunday).
0

Featured Post

Get 15 Days FREE Full-Featured Trial

Benefit from a mission critical IT monitoring with Monitis Premium or get it FREE for your entry level monitoring needs.
-Over 200,000 users
-More than 300,000 websites monitored
-Used in 197 countries
-Recommended by 98% of users

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

When you do backups in the Solaris Operating System, the file system must be inactive. Otherwise, the output may be inconsistent. A file system is inactive when it's unmounted or it's write-locked by the operating system. Although the fssnap utility…
I have been running these systems for a few years now and I am just very happy with them.   I just wanted to share the manual that I have created for upgrades and other things.  Oooh yes! FreeBSD makes me happy (as a server), no maintenance and I al…
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…
In a previous video, we went over how to export a DynamoDB table into Amazon S3.  In this video, we show how to load the export from S3 into a DynamoDB table.

630 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question