NLB, Clustering, & Terminal Server

I currently have a Terminal server that, due to unexpected growth, is getting maxed out.  I need to add another, but the issue is that the program that remote users access is a database.  Now common sense would suggest that a database on TS1 will not magically keep itself in synch with the newly added terminal server TS2.  It sounds like I may need to setup NLB for the 2 terminal servers, and setup a shared database (possibly clustering?).  We currently have a DC, and 1 TS, with 20 clients currently and about 20 TS users.  If anyone has any solutions for this scenario, or any other ideas, that would be most excellent.  Thanks.
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bleujaegelAsked:
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PberConnect With a Mentor Solutions ArchitectCommented:
Usually an application will communicate to the DB server through an OBDC DSN connection.  (Start\Programs\Administrative Tools\Data Sources (OBDC).  Usually under the System DSN tab.

If you application communicates via an OBDC connection, then the OBDC connection can be configured to point to remote servers.

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PberSolutions ArchitectCommented:
I presume your DB is SQL.  I don't know if you want to go down the Server cluster path.  Clustering isn't something to be taken lightly.  There are many issue with clustering that might outweigh the benefits.  We have 4 SQL clusters and I cringe everytime they go down.
Clustering isn't cheap either since you require shared storage like a SAN.
You could do SQL replication, but that is complex and a resource hog.  SQL Log shipping is another way to protect your DB.

Also since you have a small setup, keeping it simple might be the best bet.

In your case I would just move the Database onto it's own server.  Then point TS1 and TS2 to your new DB1 and NLB the TS servers as you mentioned.
If your DB server goes down, everyone is out of luck.  That is the situation you are in right now, if TS1 goes down, everyone is down.  If you have good backups, you should be ok.
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bleujaegelAuthor Commented:
Can you give me an example of how to point a Terminal Server to a database on another computer?  
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PberSolutions ArchitectCommented:
What kind of database is it?
What is the application that they use to access the database?
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bleujaegelAuthor Commented:
MS SQL.  Also, if another db was used instead, is there usually a big difference in how you would point Terminal Servers to the DB?  Just curious.  Thanks.
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bleujaegelAuthor Commented:
Excellent.  Thanks for the input.
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PberSolutions ArchitectCommented:
Glad to help.
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